War News

FOR THE FALLEN (September 1914)

With proud thanksgiving, a mother for her children,
England mourns for her dead across the sea.
Flesh of her flesh they were, spirit of her spirit,
Fallen in the cause of the free.

Solemn the drums thrill: Death august and royal
Sings sorrow up into immortal spheres.
There is music in the midst of desolation
And a glory that shines upon our tears.

They went with songs to the battle, they were young,
Straight of limb, true of eye, steady and aglow.
They were staunch to the end against odds uncounted,
They fell with their faces to the foe.

They shall not grow old, as we that are left grow old:
Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning
We will remember them.

They mingle not with their laughing comrades again;
They sit nor more at familiar tables of home;
They have no lot in our labour of the day-time;
They sleep beyond England’s foam.

But where our desires are and our hopes profound,
Felt as a well-spring that is hidden from sight,
To the innermost heart of their own land they are known
As the stars are known to the Night.

As the stars that shall be bright when we are dust,
Moving in marches upon the heavenly plain,
As the stars that are starry in the time of our darkness,
To the end, to the end, they remain.

LAURENCE BINYON 1869-1943

Laurence Binyon, the author of the immortal words, "They shall not grow old …", was the brother of C A Binyon, a notable Badsey resident at the beginning of the 20th century, who was very involved in village life (Binyon Close in Badsey is named after C A Binyon).

 

EXCERPTS FROM THE PARISH MAGAZINES

During the years 1914-1919, regular reports about the War appeared in the monthly Parish Magazine, primarily connected with servicemen from Badsey, Aldington and Wickhamford. It was common practice during the Great War for men to write home to their Vicar, and a number of excerpts from these letters appear in the Parish Magazine. Regular bulletins about the men’s condition also appeared. There now follows an alphabetical list (including the men of Wickhamford) of servicemen who are featured in the magazines during that period.

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

 

PRIVATE WALTER ADDIS (born 4 Oct 1897, baptised Badsey)

Vol 18, No 1, January 1915

In the course of a cheery letter to the Vicar, Private W Addis writes: "I’m sure there are a lot more Badsey Boys that are able to take their part in the game if they were to think what good they would be doing, not only for themselves but for their country."

Vol 18, No 8, August 1915

Pte W Addis, writing from France, asks the following question: "How are all the chaps going on now? Are they doing their best for their King and Country or are they walking about and hoping it will all soon be all over?"

Vol 18, No 10, October 1915

Private W Addis, writing from a hospital in France, expresses a hope that still more recruits may be raised in Badsey.

Vol 19, No 10, October 1916

Received a parcel sent abroad from Badsey Soldiers’ Fund (money raised in February 1915 by a Whist Drive and half the proceeds of the Children’s Entertainment in March).

 

TROOPER CECIL GEORGE AGG (born 2 Nov 1897, baptised Badsey)

Vol 22, No 9, September 1917

Trooper Cecil G Agg has been wounded by shrapnel in the left arm and wrist. He is in the Barrington War Hospital, Shrewsbury, and is going on well.

Vol 22, No 10, October 1917

Trooper Private Cecil Agg is progressing satisfactorily but very slowly.

Vol 22, No 11, November 1917

Pte Cecil G Agg is still going on well.

Vol 22, No 12, December 1917

Pte Cecil Agg has gone to a convalescent camp in Ireland.

Vol 23, No 5, May 1918

Pte Cecil Agg, who only recently returned to France, was seriously wounded in the hand after one night in the trenches. He is in hospital in Surrey.

 

SERGEANT JOSEPH FOSTER AGG (baptised Wickhamford 1872)

Vol 19, No 10, October 1916

Mr J F Agg, formerly clerk and organist of Badsey, is serving with a Canadian regiment.

Vol 22, No 6, June 1917

We are glad to learn that Private J F Agg and Private W Agg have arrived in England and we hope soon to welcome them to Badsey.

Vol 22, No 7, July 1917

The Vicar has received a long and interesting letter from Sergeant J F Agg, the following personal details from which will be of interest to his many friends: "There were about 20 in the Battalion when I joined up, but within three months of the start we had sent out two drafts to the front. I was asked to join the Band and held the rank of Senior Corporal, part of the time being Band Sergeant in the absence of the regular Sergeant. Our Band became a good one and we were in great demand for Recruiting Meetings, Garden Parties, etc. We made four tours and had a very fine time, sometimes marching and sometimes being conveyed in Band-wagons. Our Band consisted of 40 at its strongest, but on being ordered overseas the band was broken up and we all returned to the ranks. We had a most interesting trip to our embarkation port, being the first Canadian troops to travel through USA …. I was appointed to the police on the ship, and since I arrived in England I have been promoted Sergeant and am in charge of all the police in the area of the camp."

Vol 22, No 8, August 1917

Sergt J F Agg and Pte W Agg, of the Canadians, who paid a flying visit to Badsey a few weeks ago, were both looking remarkably fit.

Vol 23, No 5, May 1918

Pte C Jefferies, who was wounded at the beginning of the Big Push, is in the Canadian Hospital at Taplow (where Pte J F Agg is employed) and going on well.

Vol 24, No 2, February 1919

Our old organist, Mr J F Agg, played at Evensong at Badsey on Sunday January 19th. He is official organist at the chapel of the Canadian Hospital, Taplow, and is, for the present, being retained in England solely on account of his services in that capacity which are much appreciated by both staff and patients.

 

PRIVATE WILLIAM DECIMUS AGG (born 20 Nov 1892, baptised Badsey)

Vol 22, No 6, June 1917

We are glad to learn that Private J F Agg and Private W Agg have arrived in England and we hope soon to welcome them to Badsey.

Vol 22, No 8, August 1917

Sergt J F Agg and Pte W Agg, of the Canadians, who paid a flying visit to Badsey a few weeks ago, were both looking remarkably fit.

 

LIEUTENANT ALLSEBROOK

Vol 19, No 5, May 1916

Lieut Allsebrook was "wounded severely" on April 4-5. The latest report is that he is "doing well".

Vol 23, No 5, May 1918

Lieut H Allsebrook is in hospital in France recovering from an attack of fever.

Vol 23, No 12, December 1918

Lieut H Allsebrook has been seriously ill in France with influenza followed by pneumonia but is now well again.

 

SERGEANT AMOS

Vol 19, No 8, August 1916

Sergeant Amos has been wounded, his wounds of a very severe character, but he is now in England, and we are glad to know, going on well.

Vol 19, No 9, September 1916

We regret to learn that Sergt Amos is still far from convalescent, and that he has lost the sight of his right eye which was seriously injured when his steel helmet was struck by a piece of shrapnel.

Vol 20, No 2, February 1917

We are glad to welcome Mr Amos home again. He received his discharge on Jan 26th, after having served his country with conspicuous gallantry. His services would doubtless have received special recognition but for the fact that (as so frequently happens) those who were qualified to make a recommendation fell in action.

 

LIEUTENANT BAILEY

Vol 23, No 1, January 1918

There was a Memorial Service for the late Lieut Bailey, at Wickhamford, on Dec 10th. Lieut Bailey, who was beloved by all who knew him, died in Cairo on Dec 1st from wounds received in the operations which resulted in the capture of Jerusalem. He had been on active service ever since the outbreak of hostilities.

Vol 23, No 8, August 1918

A tablet has been placed over the manor house pew in Wickhamford Church, to the memory of the late Lieut Bailey, bearing the following inscription:

In loving memory of our only brother
Robert Neale Menteth Bailey
Lieut East Riding of Yorks Yeomanry
who died at Cairo on Dec 1 1917
of wounds received in action in the Holy Land
Aged 35

HLM & DC

 

DRIVER RAYMOND CHARLES BALLARD (born 16 Jan 1899)

Vol 23, No 11, November 1918

Dvr R Ballard has recently been sick and in hospital in France. Almost immediately after his return to the lines he was wounded in the arm and is now in hospital at Doncaster.

 

E A B BARNARD

Vol 23, No 8, August 1918

Mr E A B Barnard, who has been a frequent and welcome contributor to our columns, has retired from the important position which he held under the Ministry of Pensions and has enlisted in the RAF.

 

GUNNER FREDERICK JOSEPH BARNARD (born 26 Sep 1896, baptised Badsey)

Vol 23, No 5, May 1918

Gunner F Barnard has been slightly gassed.

Vol 23, No 6, June 1918

Gunner F Barnard is with his unit again.

 

PRIVATE JOHN BARNARD (born 10 Dec 1898, baptised Badsey)

Vol 23, No 5, May 1918

Pte J Barnard has been wounded in the shoulder by a shell. The degree is not stated but he writes: "Don’t worry."

Vol 23, No 6, June 1918

Pte J Barnard is with his unit again. He was hit three times before being sent to the base.

Vol 23, No 9, September 1918

The coffin [of Cpl C H Byrd], covered with the Union Jack, was carried shoulder-high from the deceased soldier’s home to the church, the bearer party, under Cpl G E Jones, and the firing party, under Sergt J Barnard, being made up of local members of the VTC.

 

CORPORAL WILLIAM HENRY BARNARD (born 26 Jan 1896, baptised Badsey)

Vol 18, No 8, August 1915

Corpl W Barnard has been wounded in France and is now in hospital at Halifax.

Vol 18, No 11, November 1915

The Vicar has received a cheery letter from Corporal W Barnard.

Vol 19, No 8, August 1916

Cpl W Barnard, of the Lincolns, has been missing since July 2. We trust Mr & Mrs Barnard’s anxiety may soon be relieved by news of their only son.

Vol 19, No 9, September 1916

There is no news of Cpl W Barnard.

Vol 22, No 5, May 1917

Mr J Barnard, of Althorpe and formerly of Badsey, has been officially informed that his only son, Cpl W Barnard of the Lincolns, who has been missing since July 1, must now be assumed to have been killed in action on or since that date. Mr and Mrs Barnard have the sympathy of their many friends in Badsey.

He appears on the Commonwealth War Graves Commission Debt of Honour Register.

 

CAPTAIN B BARTON

Vol 22, No 8, August 1917

Captain B Barton, late of Bowers Hill, was mentioned in the dispatch from Salonika published on July 23rd.

Vol 23, No 9, September 1918

It is our sorrowful duty to add two more names to the Badsey Roll of Honour. Col Bernard Barton, who formerly resided at Bowers Hill House, was killed in action in France on August 11. Col Barton was one of the very first from Badsey to volunteer for service, enlisting in the local company of Territorials on August 8 1914. His advancement was remarkably rapid. Receiving a commission in December 1914, he was promoted Captain September 1 1915, Major February 1917, and Lieut-Col June 1918. He had also been mentioned in despatches. He was severely wounded on the Salonika front in March 1917 and returned to England in consequence. On the voyage home the ship was attacked by enemy submarines in the Mediterranean, but succeeded in reaching port. He remained in England until April of the present year when he was sent to France, where he was killed as stated above. We learn that Pte T Knight, of Badsey, who used to work on land close to Col Barton’s, attended the funeral in the capacity of bandsman.

Col Barton was the son of the late Rev T H Barton, vicar of Fridaythorpe, Yorks. He was educated at S Peter’s School, York (reputed to be the oldest school in England), had served in the South African War for which he received the medal, and was formerly on the organising staff of the Yorkshire Herald.

A memorial service was held at Wickhamford on September 4.

He appears on the Commonwealth War Graves Commission Debt of Honour Register.

 

WARRANT OFFICER BAYLIS

Vol 18, No 4, April 1915

Sergeant Baylis, who is now Co Sergeant-Major, has been made a Warrant Officer.

Vol 19, No 10, October 1916

Received a parcel sent abroad from Badsey Soldiers’ Fund (money raised in February 1915 by a Whist Drive and half the proceeds of the Children’s Entertainment in March).

 

PRIVATE W BEDENHAM

Vol 23, No 8, August 1918

Pte W Bedenham was severely wounded on the Italian front on June 15. He is in hospital in Italy where he has undergone three operations. The condition of his leg is still serious, but we are glad to learn that there is good ground for hoping that it may not be found necessary to resort to amputation.

Vol 23, No 9, September 1918

Pte W Bedenham, who is still in hospital in Italy, has undergone a fourth operation. Mrs Stewart, of Aldington, has received a letter from one of the nurses who says: "I am pleased to tell you that Pte Bedenham is still improving. We hope soon to give you very good news."

Vol 24, No 1, January 1919

Pte W Bedenham, who has recently undergone a fifth operation, is in the 2nd Birmingham Hospital, at Rubery.

 

PRIVATE JOHN BENNETT (born 28 Aug 1882, baptised Badsey)

Vol 17, No 11, November 1914

Private J Bennett has been invalided home from the front suffering from rheumatism.

Vol 22, No 12, December 1917

Pte J Bennett is in hospital at Hursley, near Winchester, suffering from rheumatism.

 

LIEUTENANT BROWN-CONSTABLE

Vol 19, No 8, August 1916

Lieut Brown-Constable, of the London Scottish, who was reported as wounded and missing on July 2, is now known to be a prisoner.

Vol 19, No 9, September 1916

The announcement that Lt Brown-Constable was a prisoner was unhappily premature; there is no official news of him whatever.

 

SERGEANT W BUTCHER

Vol 23, No 7, July 1918

Sergt W Butcher, son of Mr E Butcher, of Wickhamford, has been home after being down with malaria in France. He had previously been twice wounded. Mr Butcher’s daughter, Miss M Butcher, of the QMAC, has also been home suffering from shell-shock. She was in the hospital at Etaples on which the Germans delivered their murderous aerial attack.

 

CORPORAL CECIL HENRY BYRD (born 23 Mar 1896, probably Bretforton)

Vol 23, No 5, May 1918

Cpl C Byrd has been slightly gassed and has also had trench fever. He is now in hospital at Chatham.

Vol 23, No 8, August 1918

We regret to have to announce that Cpl C Byrd’s recent illness has had serious and unexpected developments and that he now lies in a grave condition at Norton Military Hospital.

Vol 23, No 9, September 1918

On the same day on which Col Barton was killed [August 11], Cpl C H Byrd, whose serious illness we reported last month, died at Norton Barracks. Cpl Byrd enlisted in the Worcesters in September 1915, but was subsequently transferred to the Machine Gun Corps and first went to France in February 1916. On March 17 last he was gassed, and while in hospital developed trench fever. After spending three months in hospital in Kent he came home on leave in July. On reporting to Norton Barracks at the end of his leave he was again ordered to hospital where alarming symptoms were soon observed and he died on the evening of Sunday August 11, Dvr E Pillinger, who was also a patient at Norton, being with him when he passed away. He was buried with military honours at Badsey the following Thursday. The coffin, covered with the Union Jack, was carried shoulder-high from the deceased soldier’s home to the church, the bearer party, under Cpl G E Jones, and the firing party, under Sergt J Barnard, being made up of local members of the VTC. An escort from Worcester under Sergt A Spink was also in attendance. The service was choral throughout and the "Last Post" was sounded by Bugler D O’Sullivan. The funeral arrangements were in the hands of Mr Stribblehill, who, as on the occasion of Cpl Cleveley’s funeral, kindly gave his services.

Burial – Aug 15, Cecil Henry Byrd, aged 22

He appears on the Commonwealth War Graves Commission Debt of Honour Register.

 

SAMUEL JAMES BYRD

Vol 18, No 6, June 1915

S Byrd was wounded [Gallipoli]

[Earlier we thought this entry related to Sidney Byrd born 19 Aug 1898, probably at Bretforton. But we now believe it is actually Samuel James Byrd , b. 26/9/1889 in Evesham. He was in the 4th Battalion, Worcestershire Regt (based on that being Crane's Battalion) and was wounded in the foot, according to his son, Peter Byrd, now 88 and living in Evesham. Peter's brother Maurice, 92, still lives in Aldington. Peter said the wound occurred in Gallipoli. The age of the soldier also fits better with is being Samuel rather than Sydney. See also the letter from Pte Cecil H Crane below. - Tom Locke]

A CALDICOTT

Vol 18, No 6, June 1915

A Caldicott was wounded [at Gallipoli]

 

PRIVATE W H CAPENER

Vol 17, No 12, December 1914

Private W H Capener, Gloucestershire Regiment, killed in action September 26; son-in-law of Mr C Knight, late of Badsey.

 

PRIVATE ARTHUR CHAMBERLAIN (born 3 Feb 1890, probably Wellington Heath)

Vol 23, No 5, May 1918

Pte Arthur Chamberlain is reported a prisoner of war; communication has been received from him.

 

W CLEAVER

Vol 19, No 10, October 1916

Received a parcel sent abroad from Badsey Soldiers’ Fund (money raised in February 1915 by a Whist Drive and half the proceeds of the Children’s Entertainment in March).

 

CORPORAL WILLIAM EDWARD CLEVELEY (born 8 Apr 1899, baptised Badsey)

Vol 19, No 10, October 1916

Received a parcel sent abroad from Badsey Soldiers’ Fund (money raised in February 1915 by a Whist Drive and half the proceeds of the Children’s Entertainment in March).

Vol 19, No 10, October 1916

Pte W Cleveley, who was wounded two months ago, is now convalescent at Shurland, in Kent.

Vol 23, No 1, January 1918

With the passing of the Old Year came news of the death in the service of his country of Cpl W E Cleveley. Cpl Cleveley, who was only 18 years of age, enlisted quite early in the war when he was only 15. He went out to France in Jan 1916 and, after being buried by a shell and narrowly escaping with his life, was wounded in the fighting on the Somme in August of the same year. He had suffered for years from an infection of the ear and the old trouble, accentuated no doubt by his wounds, necessitated an operation as the only possible means of relief. All efforts to save his life were, however, unavailing and he passed away at the Horton War Hospital, Epsom, on Dec 31st. He was a most promising soldier, and at the time he was taken ill was on a course at the Training School for NCOs at Hertford.

Vol 23, No 2, February 1918

The funeral of the late Cpl W E Cleveley took place at Badsey on Jan 4th. By the courtesy of Major Pollexfen, a firing party from the prisoners’ guard at Evesham was in attendance. The firing party, under Sergt Major Perry, marched to the deceased’s home, and, augmented by local members of the VTC, acted as an escort, the coffin being, of course, covered with the Union Jack. The body was met at the churchyard gate by the vicar and choir and the service was fully choral. Before the congregation left the church the organist played the "Dead March" and, as the body was borne from the church to the grave, members of the VTC lined the path. At the conclusion of the Burial Office three volleys were fired over the grave and a bugler from Norton Barracks sounded the "Last Post", after which a hymn was sung and the vicar pronounced the benediction.

The whole ceremony – the slow march through the village with arms reversed, the service in church and at the graveside, the touching strains of the "Last Post" so suggestive of both a farewell and a welcome – was very impressive and was attended by a large number of friends and sympathisers.

Burial – Jan 4, William Edward Cleveley, aged 18

Vol 23, No 4, April 1918

The Military Authorities have erected a temporary cross over the grave of the late Cpl W E Cleveley, similar to those placed over soldiers’ graves at the front.

He appears on the Commonwealth War Graves Commission Debt of Honour Register.

 

B S COCKERTON

Vol 19, No 10, October 1916

Received a parcel sent abroad from Badsey Soldiers’ Fund (money raised in February 1915 by a Whist Drive and half the proceeds of the Children’s Entertainment in March).

Vol 22, No 5, May 1917

Sergt B S Cockerton is in hospital abroad.

Vol 23, No 7, July 1918

Congratulations to Sergt B S Cockerton on winning the Meritorious Service Medal.

Vol 23, No 11, November 1918

Sergt B S Cockerton has had a narrow escape in France. He was buried by a shell and, on being disinterred, was found to have sustained wounds in the back and arm, his legs also being badly bruised. He is in hospital at Treport and progressing rapidly.

 

PRIVATE L COCKERTON

Vol 22, No 10, October 1917

Private L Cockerton, ASC, is in hospital in France suffering from pleurisy.

Vol 22, No 11, November 1917

Pte L Cockerton has rejoined his unit.

 

PRIVATE P W COCKERTON

Vol 23, No 1, January 1918

Pte P W Cockerton is in hospital in Italy.

 

PRIVATE RICHARD F COLE

Vol 19, No 10, October 1916

Received a parcel sent abroad from Badsey Soldiers’ Fund (money raised in February 1915 by a Whist Drive and half the proceeds of the Children’s Entertainment in March).

Vol 22, No 7, July 1917

On June 7th, Private Richard F Cole, of the Worcesters, who had seen many months service at the front, was killed in action in France. A Memorial Service was held at Badsey on June 27.

He appears on the Commonwealth War Graves Commission Debt of Honour Register.

 

PRIVATE S COLLETT

Vol 23, No 1, January 1918

Pte S J Collett (who has been in hospital) is convalescent.

 

SERGEANT JESSE COLLEY (born 4 Nov 1897)

Vol 24, No 3, March 1919

Sergt J Colley returned from France on February 22 suffering from influenza, which rapidly developed into pneumonia. He was in a critical condition for some days but is now happily convalescent.

 

PRIVATE VINCENT COLLEY (born 18 Jan 1894)

Vol 19, No 8, August 1916

Pte Vincent Colley, of the 1st Canadian contingent, who emigrated to Canada five years ago, was killed in action on June 12. There was a Memorial Service for Pte Colley at Wickhamford on July 7.

 

GUNNER FRANK COX (born 30 Jul 1898)

Vol 19, No 8, August 1916

Gunner Frank Cox, of the RFA, died of heatstroke on July 13.

Vol 19, No 9, September 1916

There was a Memorial Service for Gunner F Cox at Wickhamford on Aug 4.

Vol 20, No 2, March 1917

Frank Cox was mentioned in an "In Memoriam" for his brother and father: "Mrs Cox, whose present bereavement is accentuated by the fact that she lost a son (one of the six she has given to the army) at Salonika only seven months ago …"

 

PRIVATE JOHN HENRY COX (born 7 Sep 1893)

Vol 17, No 10, October 1914

We omitted to state last month that Mr & Mrs Cox, of Wickhamford, had two sons serving in the army. They both went out with the Expeditionary Force, and one of them, Private J T Cox, of the Welsh Regiment, is at present at his home in Bengeworth recovering from wounds received in the battle of Aisne.

Vol 17, No 12, December 1914

We are sure all our readers sympathise with Private J T Cox and his family in his being the subject of such a cruel slander as that contained in the anonymous letter referred to in the Evesham Standard of November 28. For a soldier to be stabbed in the back by one of those in defence of whose homes he has risked his life and received honourable wounds reveals a baseness of character well-nigh inconceivable. It is a pity the authorship of the letter in question cannot be traced, though it would tax the ingenuity of man to devise a suitable punishment for the writer.

Vol 18, No 5, May 1915

Private J H Cox, who was wounded in the thigh, near St Eloi, on March 28th, while rescuing a wounded comrade, is now being cared for at Dalmeny House, Lord Rosebery’s residence on the Firth of Forth.

 

PRIVATE CECIL HARRY CRANE (born 9 Jan 1892, baptised Badsey)

Vol 18, No 6, June 1915

Although much has been published in the newspapers about the landing in the Gallipoli Peninsula and the subsequent fighting there, the following extract from a letter from Pte Cecil H Crane will be of interest.

Writing to his wife under date May 6, Pte Crane says: "I haven’t written for a fortnight as we have been fighting day and night and only got relieved out of the firing-line yesterday. We have had some terrible fighting here, especially the last four days. The first was bad as we had to land under a heavy fire and then drive them back with the bayonet. The fourth day was the worst (April 29). How I shall remember that day!. We were fighting from morning till night and lost a lot of men …. G Crisp, A Caldicott and S Byrd were wounded, but Jeff and I and most of the other Evesham chaps got through it all right. You will be glad to hear, if you haven’t seen it in the papers when you get this, that the Worcesters were singled out for special praise; so you see we soon made our name, tho’ at what a cost! And we who are left can only thank God for bringing us through such a day, as we were outnumbered by 10 to 1. How they cut us down you can only guess and we were forced to retire at the finish with about half as many men as we went out with; but we have got through the worst, I think, as we have got a lot of reinforcements come now, so I think we shall soon push them back. We have got the Gurkhas here now and they are terrors with their knives. I have got a turkish bugle which I am trying to keep to bring back. I forgot to mention that in the big fight we threw our packs away and of course our writing-paper with them so you might send me some if you can. You needn’t send any tobacco as I have got over 2 lbs now as they serve us out some and I get Jeff’s [Jeffries] as well. Remember me to all and tell them I hope to be with you all again soon."

The above correspondent is an Old Chorister of Badsey.

Vol 18, No 6, June 1915

A postcard from Pte Crane, dated May 13, stated that he was then in hospital but going on well.

Vol 18, No 7, July 1915

Private C Crane, who has been invalided to Malta, has now returned to active service.

Vol 18, No 8, August 1915

Pte C Crane has had one very narrow escape, his rifle being smashed in his hands by a Turkish bullet.

Vol 18, No 9, September 1915

Private C H Crane, writing to Mr R Pethard under date July 27, says: "Since I last wrote to you I’ve seen some life and had one or two near ones, but, thank God, they haven’t got me yet, although there’s only a few of us left now that were in the landing. I daresay you know that Jeffries is wounded, so that I’m the only lucky one out of all the Evesham District now. But I mustn’t brag as you never know when your turn is coming, and it makes you think seriously of higher things here when you are seeing death every day in different forms, and you can’t help but think that one of these might easily have been you. You may have seen the account of a charge by one company of Worcesters and one of the Royal Scots, on June 4th I think it was. Well, I’m proud to think it was W Co, and we had nothing but compliments for a good many days after. I think we went mad somehow as we only wanted four trenches, but once we started they wouldn’t stop, and we had taken seven before we gave in, only we had to go back three because the others were left behind on either side of us. The last position we held was one taken by the Gurkhas. My word, what a sight it was! …. I suppose you are having a busy time now? …. The worst part out here is the water which it is a job to get, and we have known the meaning of the word ‘thirst’ above once, I can tell you, though it keeps getting better. Well, I suppose I must now close now hoping to be remembered to all old pals."

Vol 18, No 9, September 1915

We regret to learn, as we go to press, that Mrs Cecil Crane has been officially informed that her husband is missing. We hope she may soon have reassuring news of him.

Vol 18, No 10, October 1915

We regret to learn that no further news has been received of Pte C Crane.

Vol 19, No 4, April 1916

Universal sympathy is felt for Mrs C H Crane who, after hoping against hope for six months, has at last been informed by the War Office that her husband, Private C H Crane, of the 4th Worcesters, must be regarded as having been killed in action on or about August 6. A full congregation assembled for the memorial service held on March 7th. The service was choral and the rendering of the music was a credit to both choir and organist. A prayer for the departed was taken from the Worcester Diocesan Monthly Intercession Paper.

He appears on the Commonwealth War Graves Commission Debt of Honour Register.

 

PRIVATE ERNEST CRANE (born 19 Feb 1895, baptised Badsey)

Vol 19, No 10, October 1916

Received a parcel sent abroad from Badsey Soldiers’ Fund (money raised in February 1915 by a Whist Drive and half the proceeds of the Children’s Entertainment in March).

Vol 23, No 12, December 1918

Pte E Crane has been in hospital in Birmingham seriously ill with pneumonia following influenza, but is, we are glad to say, now well again.

 

PRIVATE THOMAS WILLIAM CRANE (born 20 Jun 1891, baptised Badsey)

Vol 18, No 1, January 1915

Private T W Crane, of the Coldstream Guards, is also in hospital in England, having been invalided home suffering from rheumatism.

Vol 19, No 10, October 1916

Received a parcel sent abroad from Badsey Soldiers’ Fund (money raised in February 1915 by a Whist Drive and half the proceeds of the Children’s Entertainment in March).

 

PRIVATE WALTER CRANE (born 4 Oct 1896, baptised Badsey)

Vol 19, No 8, August 1916

Private Walter Crane, of the Worcs Regt, died on July 12 of wounds received in action. There was a Memorial Service for Pte Crane at Badsey on July 14.

He appears on the Commonwealth War Graves Commission Debt of Honour Register.

 

PRIVATE ARTHUR GEORGE CRISP (born 11 Jul 1897, baptised Badsey)

Vol 17, No 12, December 1914

Pte F T Hartwell writes in a letter to the Vicar: "Cecil Jeffries and George Crisp are at Tregantle Fort about four miles away, and the last time I saw them they were quite well and happy, but I don’t see them very often now."

Vol 18, No 6, June 1915

G Crisp was wounded [at Gallipoli].

Vol 18, No 6, June 1915

Pte G Crisp, who had the first finger of his left hand shot away on the occasion above referred to [C Jeffries’ account of fighting at Gallipoli], writes to his mother (May 16) from the Military Hospital, S George’s Barracks, Malta: "I am getting on as well as can be expected and my finger will soon be better. this is a fine place where I am now – an ideal place for the wounded. The people here have treated us well, giving us plenty of cigarettes, etc. It is a treat to be here in peace after the terrible time we had during the landing. One of the first to get killed was Brig-Gen Napier of the 88th Brigade. He was killed the minute he stepped from the boat on to the beach. Most of our battalion got on shore safely but we lost a good many during the advance …. I have received no letters since the one which I received at Lemnos. When you reply to this just tell me if Jeffries has sent any letters. I never saw him after Wednesday morning. the forcing of the Straits will not take long, but their concealed batteries caused us and the navy a lot of trouble."

The above correspondent is an Old Chorister of Badsey.

Vol 18, No 7, July 1915

Now at the Pembroke Convalescent Camp, Malta.

Vol 18, No 8, August 1915

Mentioned in C Jeffries’ letter to his sister (Jeffries had just arrived at S Andrew’s Hospital, Malta): "I am going to have a look for Crisp when I can get out; S George’s Barracks is not far from here."

Vol 18, No 8, August 1915

Pte G Crisp left Malta for the Dardanelles on July 26.

Vol 18, No 10, October 1915

Pte G Crisp, who is in hospital at Port Said recovering from wounds and enteric, expects to be sent home soon. Mr E Crisp has very kindly lent the Vicar a diary kept by Pte Crisp, noting the events of each day from March 20th, when he left Leamington, to April 30th, when, after being wounded in action, his finger was amputated. The diary, which is interesting as it is brief, gives an excellent impression of the writer’s experiences, and deserves to be preserved as an heirloom.

Vol 18, No 11, November 1915

Pte G Crisp, writing to his parents, says, "I hope I shall soon be home safe (I can’t say sound) and well."

Vol 18, No 12, December 1915

Now in hospital in England.

Vol 19, No 9, September 1916

Pte G Crisp, who has seen much service for one of his years and was twice wounded in Gallipoli, has again been hit but not put out of action.

Vol 19, No 10, October 1916

Received a parcel sent abroad from Badsey Soldiers’ Fund (money raised in February 1915 by a Whist Drive and half the proceeds of the Children’s Entertainment in March).

Vol 19, No 11, November 1916

Private G Crisp is again in hospital.

Vol 22, No 6, June 1917

Pte G Crisp, writing apparently of the action on May 20, says of Lieut G Mason [who was reported missing], "in the opinion of all here he deserved the VC".

Vol 23, No 6, June 1918

Very hearty congratulations to Pte G Crisp on winning the Military Medal "for bravery in the field between the dates of Mar 13th and 21st". Pte Crisp was one of the earliest and youngest recruits from Badsey and one of the heroes of the landing from the Clyde, the fame of which will live as long as the name of England lives, and his many friends will rejoice in this official recognition of his valour and patriotism.

Vol 23, No 7, July 1918

Pte G Crisp, MM, has (under pressure from home) sent his sister the following account of the circumstances under which he won his decoration. "It happened like this. We were defending a village during Fritz’s bid for Calais. We had beaten off all attacks, and were thinking that all was OK. However, he had managed to break through on the flanks and had almost surrounded us. We could get no communication with our BHQ , so things began to look black. Well, I was given a message which was to be delivered to BHQ at all costs. I managed to get to the village all right and made my way to where the BHQ was. What a shock I had as I got there to see that Fritz was occupying the place! How I escaped I really do not know. First I dodged from one house to another, with bullets whizzing everywhere. Still, I managed it, and eventually made my way to a HQ which I found to be Gloucesters’ of Harry’s Division. Here the message was received, and after getting a good drink of Scotch from the Gloucesters’ CO, I managed to get back all right in time to lead out the Company to where we had to retire to. We could only get out one way, and just managed it by the skin of our teeth. I was quite prepared for a trip to Germany as our case seemed hopeless. What with shells and machine-gun fire I hope I shall never see a time like it again. Still, here I am quite in the pink and hope to keep so."

Vol 23, No 8, August 1918

As a memento of the famous landing in which he took part, Pte G Crisp, MM, has been the recipient of a portrait of his old Commander bearing the following autograph inscription: "From your comrade and Commander at the Landing at Cape Helles, 25th April 1915, Aylmer Hunter Weston, Lt General.

 

SAPPER FRANCIS HENRY CRISP (born 8 Apr 1893, baptised Badsey)

Vol 19, No 10, October 1916

Received a parcel sent abroad from Badsey Soldiers’ Fund (money raised in February 1915 by a Whist Drive and half the proceeds of the Children’s Entertainment in March).

Vol 24, No 1, January 1919

Sapper H Crisp has had a severe attack of trench fever from the effects of which he has not yet completely recovered.

 

PRIVATE EDGAR GEORGE CULL (born 25 Feb 1897, baptised Badsey)

Vol 18, No 7, July 1915

Another "Old Chorister" who was wounded at Festubert on June 24th, has arrived at the Red Cross Hospital, Winchcombe.

Vol 23, No 5, May 1918

Pte E Cull is reported a prisoner of war. No communication has been received from him, and everyone sympathises very deeply with Mr and Mrs Cull in their anxiety …. It is possible that the absence of news of Pte Cull may be accounted for by the fact that he is wounded.

Vol 23, No 6, June 1918

News has at last been received from Pte E Cull who is a prisoner of war in Germany. Like our other Badsey men in Germany he sends most cheery messages, making light of the trails and hardships incident to the lot of the captive.

Vol 24, No 1, January 1919

Prisoner of war, Pte E Cull, had speech with the Crown Prince whom he found to be "not such a fool as the pictures make out".

 

PRIVATE JOHN SIDNEY CULL (born 2 Nov 1890, baptised Badsey)

Vol 23, No 12, December 1918

On November 11, just as the bells were celebrating the armistice with a merry peal, Mr Cull received a telegram to the effect that his son, Pte J S Cull, had died of influenza at Busra, on the Tigris, on October 25. Pte Cull offered his services for his country in August 1914, but was rejected on medical grounds. Two month later he was passed as "fit" and enlisted in the Worcestershire Yeomanry. After a machine-gun course he went out to Mesopotamia as a mounted machine-gunner, in which capacity he was a considerable amount of fighting. He was formerly a chorister at Badsey Church. Mrs Cull recently received a letter written by Pte Cull on October 9 in which he stated that, although there had been fatal cases of influenza, he was in the best of health. A memorial service arranged for November 22 was postponed owing to the Vicar’s illness.

Vol 24, No 1, January 1919

There was a memorial service at Badsey for the late Pte J S Cull on December 19.

Vol 24, No 4, April 1919

Mrs J S Cull has received from one of the late Cpl Cull’s officers a letter of sympathy in the course of which he says: "I have found your husband the most willing and obliging man I have ever met. I can honestly say that he was the best man I had under my command. We have been together under fire, and he displayed a coolness and courage any man might envy. He was most popular amongst all ranks and his loss is keenly felt amongst both officers and men."

He appears on the Commonwealth War Graves Commission Debt of Honour Register.

 

PRIVATE J DEIGHTON

Vol 23, No 5, May 1918

We regret to learn that Pte J Deighton, son-in-law of Mrs Walker, of Badsey, was killed in action early in April.

 

LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER JAMES SHOLTO DOUGLAS

Vol 17, No 11, November 1914

Lieut Douglas appears to have had an exciting time with the Naval Brigade in Antwerp, where he was in command of a machine-gun section. He made the personal acquaintance of the now famous trenches and was apparently one of the last to leave the city, "dodging shells and falling houses" in the progress through it. But for his resourcefulness, which enabled him to reach Ostend in safety, he would probably now be interned in Holland instead of being luminously housed at the Crystal Palace.

Vol 20, No 1, January 1917

It is with very deep regret that we chronicle the death of Lt-Commander James Sholto Douglas, late of Badsey Manor House, at the comparatively early age of 27. As our readers will remember, he volunteered for service with the Navy immediately on the outbreak of war, and was gazetted Lietenant in the RNVR after an interview with the First Lord of the Admiralty. He went to Antwerp in command of a machine-gun section, and only escaped internment by his courage and resourcefulness. When we last referred to him in these columns he was stationed with the Naval Brigade at the Crystal Palace. He was subsequently attached to the RNAS as armament officer and was for some time at Dunquerque, taking up an appointment as Lieut-Commander near Aberdeen in October last. In November he began to suffer very much from very severe headaches and was sent home to Chester. He rapidly became much worse; and was unconscious almost continuously to the time of his death. A few days before his death he had very slight conscious intervals; he recognised his mother and asked for one of his brothers, and on one occasion felt for his crucifix under his pillow and looked at it. He passed away on Monday morning, Dec 18th, and on Tuesday his body was taken into the Lady Chapel of Chester Cathedral where it remained until the funeral on Wednesday. There was a Requiem on Wednesday morning, a watch having been kept all Tuesday night by relations and friends.

The following tribute from his brother seems to describe the man just as we knew him.

I thank Thee, God, for his life here,
For all his graces, all his ways so dear.
Ready of repartee,
Soul of all company,
Bright with the love of men because of God;
Strong in the love of God for other men.
The Sacramental way on earth he trod,
And now his earthly body’s dead – well, then,
I praise and thank Thee, still, O God.

He appears on the Commonwealth War Graves Commission Debt of Honour Register.

 

LIEUTENANT DRYSDALE

Vol 18, No 5, May 1915

On all sides there have been expressions of sympathy with Mrs Drysdale in the loss of her son, Lieut Drysdale, of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment. Had his devotion to duty been less his life would, in all human probability, have been longer. Undertaking new duties and responsibilities at a time when he was not even convalescent from influenza, and when he was altogether unequal to work of any description, he became depressed and despondent about ever being able to cope with them. As his academic record and the testimony of his Colonel showed, his natural gifts were such as go to make a capable and efficient officer. It was, in fact, in consequence of his qualifications and in the hope that his health might improve that he was urged by his Colonel to retain his commission when he asked to be relieved of it. Unhappily, he never recovered from the effects of the initial strain and the burden eventually proved more than he could bear.

There was a Memorial Service for the late Lieutenant Drysdale at Wickhamford on April 20th.

 

LIEUTENANT J M DRYSDALE

Vol 19, No 9, September 1916

Lieut J M Drysdale, who was wounded in an air-fight behind the German lines on Aug 26 is, we are glad to hear, rapidly recovering. He received his wound when at an altitude of 2000 feet, but managed his descent so skilfully that he alighted at the spot from which he started. He was warmly commended by his CO for his gallantry and skill.

Vol 23, No 4, April 1918

Hearty congratulations to Lieut J M Drysdale on his "mention" in the despatch of March 13th.

Vol 23, No 9, September 1918

Lieut J M Drysdale is now engaged in the agreeable but responsible task of transporting distinguished passengers to and from France.

Vol 24, No 6, June 1919

Capt J M Drysdale, late of the RAF, has received from Sir Woodman Burbidge, managing director of Harrods Stores, a gold cigarette-case in commemoration of the "first commercial flight". This took place on March 1 1919 when Captain Drysdale piloted Sir Woodman to Brussels.

 

PRIVATE EMMS

Vol 20, No 1, January 1917

Private Emms, writing from France, says of Corpl Sparrow [who died on 22 Oct 1916] that "he will be very much missed in dear old Badsey Church". He then goes on to say: "I often wish I was there to join in the services, but I think myself that it will be a long time before I shall be able to help to do a little chiming. We have a RC church close to our hospital, and one of their bells is just like No 7 in our church …. I get to Church every Sunday morning, the service being held in one of the huts. We have a bright little service and have Holy Communion every second Sunday in the month, so you see we are not so badly off in that respect."

 

PRIVATE WILLIAM ENSTONE (born 26 Mar 1889, baptised Badsey)

Vol 23, No 5, May 1918

Pte W Enstone has been in hospital and is now convalescent.

 

A EVANS

Vol 19, No 10, October 1916

Received a parcel sent abroad from Badsey Soldiers’ Fund (money raised in February 1915 by a Whist Drive and half the proceeds of the Children’s Entertainment in March).

 

PRIVATE EDWARD EVANS (born 17 Oct 1898, baptised Badsey)

Vol 22, No 10, October 1917

Private Edward Evans, who has been in hospital as the result of a chill, is now well again.

 

TROOPER ERNEST EVANS (born 9 Oct 1881, Evesham)

Vol 22, No 8, August 1917

Trooper E Evans, of the Warwickshire Yeomanry, has turned out an excellent shot and succeeded in carrying off a shooting-prize.

 

LANCE-CORPORAL GEORGE EVANS (born 8 Jun 1896, baptised Badsey)

Vol 19, No 1, January 1916

Invalided from Gallipoli; in hospital in Malta.

Vol 19, No 3, March 1916

Mentioned in a letter from Malta by L H Sparrow to the Vicar: "I have met G Evans; my word it has made a man of him. I think he is sure to be 6ft tall and he is looking well with it."

Vol 19, No 10, October 1916

Received a parcel sent abroad from Badsey Soldiers’ Fund (money raised in February 1915 by a Whist Drive and half the proceeds of the Children’s Entertainment in March).

Vol 20, No 1, January 1917

Private George Evans was slightly wounded on Dec 15th.

Vol 22, No 8, August 1917

Lance-Corporal Geo Evans has, we are glad to learn, recovered from his wounds, which were somewhat serious, and has returned from India to his regiment.

 

PRIVATE JOHN GARDNER

Vol 17, No 12, December 1914

Private John Gardner, South Wales Borderers, killed in action September 25; brother of Mrs Williams of Wickhamford.

 

PRIVATE HAROLD GASKIN (born 9 Feb 1889)

Vol 18, No 8, August 1915

Private H Gaskin is reported to have been slightly wounded.

Vol 19, No 4, April 1916

In the prayer for the departed [at the Memorial Service held for C H Crane on March 7th – Ed], which was taken from the Worcester Diocesan Monthly Intercession Paper, mention was also made of Harold Gaskin, formerly of Badsey, who lost his life since the last service of the kind was held, dying in hospital at Alexandria.

He appears on the Commonwealth War Graves Commission Debt of Honour Register.

 

LIEUTENANT GAUKROGER

Vol 19, No 5, May 1916

We regret to learn that Lieut Gaukroger’s wounds, which were first said to be "slight", are now reported to be "severe".

Vol 22, No 5, May 1917

Our readers will have heard with regret of the death of Lieut H Gaukroger. Lieut Gaukroger volunteered early in the war and had seen active service both in France and Mesopotamia, being wounded on the latter front over a year ago. He went out again to France in March, before he had thoroughly recovered from the effects of his wound, and was reported as missing on April 2 and afterwards as killed-in-action on that date.

 

PRIVATE F GREEN

Vol 18, No 7, July 1915

Private F Green, of the Grenadier Guards, who was invalided home seriously ill some time ago, is still confined to bed.

 

WILLIAM ALBERT HAINES (born 26 Mar 1892, baptised Badsey)

Vol 19, No 10, October 1916

Received a parcel sent abroad from Badsey Soldiers’ Fund (money raised in February 1915 by a Whist Drive and half the proceeds of the Children’s Entertainment in March).

 

NORRIS HAINES (born 9 Jul 1889, baptised Badsey)

Vol 19, No 10, October 1916

Received a parcel sent abroad from Badsey Soldiers’ Fund (money raised in February 1915 by a Whist Drive and half the proceeds of the Children’s Entertainment in March).

 

E HALFORD

Vol 19, No 10, October 1916

Received a parcel sent abroad from Badsey Soldiers’ Fund (money raised in February 1915 by a Whist Drive and half the proceeds of the Children’s Entertainment in March).

Vol 19, No 10, October 1916

Pte E Halford, who has been severely wounded, is in hospital at Stourbridge.

 

PRIVATE HORACE HALFORD (born 11 Mar 1887)

Vol 18, No 4, April 1915

Private Horace Halford, of Bower’s Hill, is reported wounded, but we have no particulars.

Vol 22, No 7, July 1917

Corpl Horace Halford of the Worcesters, is officially reported missing.

Vol 23, No 5, May 1918

There was a memorial service at Wickhamford on April 1st for Corpl Horace Halford who has been missing since May 20th 1917, and who is now assumed to have been killed in action on that date.

He appears on the Commonwealth War Graves Commission Debt of Honour Register.

 

PRIVATE E C HALL

Vol 22, No 8, August 1917

Private E C Hall, whose services are sadly missed at Wickhamford, was confirmed at Rouen, on June 21st.

Vol 22, No 12, December 1917 (same person?)

Pte E H Hall is not progressing very satisfactory.

Vol 23, No 3, March 1918

Pte Hall took a prominent part in the Yuletide theatricals at Lordswood VAD Hospital where he had been for some time a patient. Those who know him as well as we do will not be surprised to learn that, according to the Harborne News, "Pte Hall was the centre and pleasure of the whole evening, and the merriment he caused will never be forgotten." At another entertainment given at the same hospital on January 26 Pte Hall "was quite excellent" in the farce, "My Turn Next" and brought the evening to a close with a very amusing impromptu sketch.

 

MECHANIC W HALL

Vol 18, No 12, December 1915

Mechanic W Hall is recovering from the effects of his accident, but his progress is very slow.

 

CORPORAL H HANCOX

Vol 23, No 1, January 1918

We record with regret the death of Cpl H Hancox, son of Mr & Mrs R Hancox, of Bowers Hill, who was killed in action in France on Dec 7th. A Memorial Service was held at Willersey. Much sympathy is felt for Corporal Hancox’s parents who now also mourn the death of a daughter.

He appears on the Commonwealth War Graves Commission Debt of Honour Register.

 

PRIVATE W HANKS

Vol 22, No 9, September 1917

News has been received of the death of Pte W Hanks, Worcestershire Regt, late of Aldington and formerly of Badsey, who was killed in action in France on July 5. Pte Hanks was one of those who volunteered for service before the introduction of "Groups" and "Classes", having enlisted in September 1915, and had been in France about a year. Much sympathy is felt for his wife and child and aged father.

Vol 22, No 10, October 1917

A Memorial Service was held in Badsey on September 12th for Private W Hanks, a notice of whose death appeared in our last issue.

He appears on the Commonwealth War Graves Commission Debt of Honour Register.

 

GUNNER JOHN THOMAS HARRIS (born 7 Jul 1898, baptised Badsey)

Vol 22, No 9, September 1917

Gunner J T Harris, RFA, was rather badly kicked in the face by a horse to which he was attending on August 16. Happily the effects were not so serious as at first anticipated and he hopes to be home soon.

Vol 23, No 3, March 1918

Gunner J T Harris was admitted to hospital in France on Feb 15th suffering from a sharp attack of trench-fever. He is now convalescent.

 

PRIVATE S HARRIS

Vol 22, No 12, December 1917

Pte S Harris is not progressing very satisfactory.

Vol 23, No 1, January 1918

Pte S Harris is convalescent.

Vol 23, No 11, November 1918

Pte S Harris was discharged from the army on September 30 as unfit for service. He was sent into hospital at St Omer after being wounded in the foot and, while there, the hospital was bombed by enemy airmen. Two sisters who were attending to him at the time were both killed and, as a result of the terrible injuries he then received, one of his arms is now completely withered. It is to be hoped that, when the time for reckoning comes, neither the criminals responsible for such attacks on hospitals nor those whom they have maimed and crippled for life will be allowed to go unrewarded.

 

CORPORAL CECIL DANIEL HARTWELL (born 27 May 1896, baptised Badsey)

Vol 22, No 10, October 1917

Private Cecil Hartwell, who returned to the front on August 2nd, was admitted to hospital on August 24th suffering from wounds and slight shell-shock. He has now recovered and returned to duty.

Vol 22, No 11, November 1917

We regret that Cpl Cecil Hartwell was described in our last issue as Pte Cecil Hartwell.

Vol 23, No 1, January 1918

Cpl C Hartwell is going on well, as is his brother, W Hartwell.

Vol 23, No 2, February 1918

Cpl C Hartwell is convalescent.

 

PRIVATE FREDERICK THOMAS HARTWELL (born 31 Aug 1893, baptised Badsey)

Vol 17, No 12, December 1914

We print the following extract from a letter received by the Vicar from Pte F T Hartwell, of the 12th Worcesters, by way of giving effect to the writer’s wishes:

"I thought you would like to know how I was getting on, so that you could advise some of the other Badsey chaps to join, but I expect they are a bit timid. But tell them not to hang back for they may have to come in the finish, and they will find it the best life going for them, with plenty of open air and drills. They would find it hard at first but would soon get used to it. I have been up 12 weeks and I wish now I had joined before, for we get plenty of good food and what could a man wish more? We are billeted in cow-sheds and barns, but we are all quite happy with a straw bed and three blankets and two blue suits. Cecil Jeffries and George Crisp are at Tregantle Fort about four miles away, and the last time I saw them they were quite well and happy, but I don’t see them very often now. I am the only Badsey chap in our company, but there are some Bretforton chaps here and what one has not got and the others have we all share like brothers. But just buck the other fellows up and get them to join and then old Badsey will not be behind. We sometimes get an Evesham paper here and we are soon after the Evesham chaps for it for we like to see some of our district news."

Such an appeal ought to draw men to the colours if anything will. It is so much more effective to be able to say "Won’t you come?" than to have to say, "You ought to go." The life depicted by the writer is not exactly one of luxury, but those who would jib at such conditions here would cut a poor figure in the trenches at the front. Pte Hartwell feels, as do many both in the home camps and at the front, that those who are now serving their country are not receiving the backing they deserve, and he hazards a guess at the reason why there have not been more recruits from Badsey – "I expect they are a bit timid." His judgment may be at fault, but his suspicions are not unnatural and they are at least politely expressed, but, as the author of The English Army From Within remarks, "the country has called, and there are ugly names for those who, without sufficient claims of kin to form cause for exemption, refuse to answer the call."

Vol 19, No 11, November 1916

Lance-Sergt Frederick Thomas Hartwell, of the Worcestershire Regiment, son of Mrs D Hartwell, was killed on October 9th by a shell which burst in the entrance to his dug-out. Sergt Hartwell will be remembered as one of those who volunteered very soon after the outbreak of war, and long before the authorities found it necessary to resort to "compulsion" In the course of an appreciative letter to Sergt Hartwell’s mother, his chaplain writes: "Your son was respected and liked by all who knew him as a gallant man and a good NCO, and the Commanding Officer, his Company Officers, and comrades all send you their sincerest sympathy." Lieut Brewer also writes: "I was his Platoon Officer and, although I had not been with his platoon long, I had begun to look on Sergt Hartwell as someone whose courage and devotion to duty I could rely on." The funeral took place in "the little cemetery just behind the trenches", and the large congregation which assembled for the Memorial Service at Badsey on October 25 showed respect for the dead and sympathy with the bereaved.

He appears on the Commonwealth War Graves Commission Debt of Honour Register.

 

PRIVATE PERCIVAL M HARTWELL (born 2 Oct 1895)

Vol 22, No 6, June 1917

It now appears that Pte P M Hartwell, who wrote from a certain port to his mother of his satisfaction at finding himself once more on dry land, was alluding, not to the unpleasant sensations inseparable from a first voyage, but to his experiences when the liner by which he went out was torpedoed and sunk.

Vol 22, No 10, October 1917

Private Percy Hartwell has been in hospital in India with malarial fever but is now convalescent.

 

GUNNER RICHARD HARTWELL (born 18 Sep 1895, baptised Badsey)

Vol 23, No 4, April 1918

Gunner R Hartwell has been wounded in the left arm, right knee and back. He is in France in the 6th Australian Hospital.

 

PRIVATE WILLIAM HARTWELL (born 8 Feb 1884, baptised Badsey)

Vol 23, No 1, January 1918

W Hartwell of the RN (brother of Cpl C Hartwell) has now recovered from his wounds.

Vol 24, No 1, January 1919

Pte W Hartwell is reported sick.

 

PRIVATE CHARLES HARWOOD (born 4 Feb 1899, baptised Badsey)

Vol 23, No 4, April 1918

Pte C Harwood is in hospital at Rouen suffering from an abscess in the back of a very serious nature.

Vol 23, No 5, May 1918

Pte Charles Harwood, whose illness was reported in our last issue, passed away at Rouen on April 22nd and was buried in the English Cemetery there. He had not been in France very long, and had only been up the line a few days when he was sent into hospital where the seriousness of his illness was at once recognised. He was one who had endeared himself to many in these parishes, and the news of his death called forth expressions of sorrow and sympathy on all hands. The memorial service at Badsey on April 30th was largely attended.

He appears on the Commonwealth War Graves Commission Debt of Honour Register.

 

PRIVATE OLIVER GEORGE HARWOOD (born 21 Sep 1896, baptised Badsey)

Vol 23, No 5, May 1918

Pte G Harwood has sustained burns to the face and head and is now convalescent.

Vol 23, No 10, October 1918

Pte G Harwood was wounded in the head, face and neck on September 20. He is in hospital at Glen Parva, Leicester, where he is doing well.

 

CORPORAL A HATCHER

Vol 23, No 12, December 1918

Corpl A Hatcher has been awarded the Military Medal "for his bravery and skill when one of a daylight-patrol near Gomiecourt, August 23 1918". He rescued his sergeant under heavy machine-gun fire and was decorated on the field. He is in hospital at Chelsea where he is recovering from the effects of a bullet-wound in the left shoulder.

 

G HEALEY

Vol 19, No 10, October 1916

Received a parcel sent abroad from Badsey Soldiers’ Fund (money raised in February 1915 by a Whist Drive and half the proceeds of the Children’s Entertainment in March).

 

PRIVATE ALAN HEATH (baptised Badsey 1877)

Vol 22, No 10, October 1917

Private Alan Heath is in hospital in Birmingham slowly recovering from the effects of trench-fever contracted in France.

Vol 22, No 12, December 1917

Pte A Heath is deriving much benefit from a course of treatment at Droitwich.

 

LIEUT HENDERSON

Vol 17, No 10, October 1914

Mrs Ashwin’s grandson, Lieut Henderson, of the Royal Scots, who was wounded in one of the earlier engagements of the war, has now returned to active service.

Vol 17, No 11, November 1914

Lieut Henderson has again been wounded and has this time returned to England for treatment. He has had the honour of being mentioned in dispatches.

 

MAJOR HEPBURN

Vol 22, No 9, September 1917

Congratulations to Major Hepburn on his promotion.

 

CORPORAL G HERBERT

Vol 18, No 12, December 1915

Corporal G Herbert is in hospital in France, seriously ill.

Vol 19, No 10, October 1916

Received a parcel sent abroad from Badsey Soldiers’ Fund (money raised in February 1915 by a Whist Drive and half the proceeds of the Children’s Entertainment in March).

 

PRIVATE CYRIL P HERITAGE (born 4 Jan 1896, probably Wickhamford)

Vol 23, No 4, April 1918

Pte C P Heritage has been severely wounded in the right foot and fore-arm and is in hospital in Cardiff.

Vol 23, No 5, May 1918

Pte C Heritage is now at Llanelly and is likely to be in hospital for some time as the shrapnel has not yet all been removed from his foot.

 

RIFLEMAN J HILL

Vol 23, No 10, October 1918

Rifleman J Hill received shell-wounds in the right foot, right wrist and knee on September 2. He arrived in England on September 17.

 

PRIVATE ALBERT WILLIAM HOLLAND

Vol 23, No 2, February 1918

Mr and Mrs Holland, of Wickhamford, have been officially informed that their son, Pte Albert William Holland, was killed in action in France on Jan 1st. Pte Holland, who was only just 19 years of age, had not been in France many weeks. Mrs Holland has received a letter from her son’s platoon officer in which he writes as follows: "During the short time he was with me he proved to be one of my best and most willing men. Although still very young he had the nerve of many men much older and I shall greatly miss him." A memorial service was held at Wickhamford on Jan 23rd.

 

LIONEL R HOLMES

Vol 19, No 4, April 1916

In the prayer for the departed [at the Memorial Service held for C H Crane on March 7th], which was taken from the Worcester Diocesan Monthly Intercession Paper, mention was also made of Lionel R Holmes, brother of Mrs Thelwall, late of Badsey, who lost his life since the last service of the kind was held, being killed in the first landing at Gallipoli.

 

FRANCIS J HUTCHINGS (born 10 Nov 1893)

Vol 23, No 4, April 1918

F J Hutchings (CC, RN) who is in delicate health, has been discharged from the Navy as unfit for service.

 

PRIVATE ALBERT HUXLEY (born 11 Jul 1895)

Vol 22, No 9, September 1917

Pte Albert Huxley, who has been severely wounded in the neck and shoulder, is in hospital in France.

Vol 22, No 11, November 1917

Pte A Huxley, who was reported wounded, has now recovered and been home on leave.

Vol 22, No 12, December 1917

We regret to state that Cpl A Huxley (brother of Pte F Huxley), who was recently home on leave, has been killed in France while on sentry duty. This makes the third death at the front among those employed on Mr Mason’s farm when war broke out.

Vol 23, No 1, January 1918

There was a Memorial Service for the late Cpl A Huxley at Badsey, on Dec 5th.

He appears on the Commonwealth War Graves Commission Debt of Honour Register.

 

PRIVATE FREDERICK HUXLEY (born 1 Apr 1886)

Vol 22, No 12, December 1917

Pte F Huxley (brother of Cpl A Huxley) is in hospital at Wimereux, suffering from shell-wounds in the right arm and leg.

 

PRIVATE A W IDIENS

Vol 18, No 6, June 1915

Pte A W Idiens, of the 2nd Canadian Contingent and sometime Organist of Wickhamford, received a shrapnel wound in the arm in the recent fighting round Ypres and is now in the RNO Hospital, Great Portland Street.

 

PRIVATE CECIL JEFFRIES (born 17 Apr 1898, baptised Badsey)

Vol 17, No 12, December 1914

Pte F T Hartwell writes in a letter to the Vicar: "Cecil Jeffries and George Crisp are at Tregantle Fort about four miles away, and the last time I saw them they were quite well and happy, but I don’t see them very often now."

Vol 18, No 6, June 1915

Excerpt from a letter from Private Cecil H Crane to the Vicar: "You needn’t send any tobacco as I have got over 2 1bs now as they serve us out some and I get Jeff’s as well."

Vol 18, No 6, June 1915

Pte C Jeffries, in a letter to his sister dated May 4, tells much the same tale [as Cecil H Crane] of the fighting in the Gallipoli Peninsula. He writes: We have just been relieved out of the trenches after a spell of 48 hours. We have been awake all night and day for the last three days, and now I am going to have a sleep as we have to get a nap when we can …. I wish this was all over; it is awful. This morning the Turks started to retire along a ridge in hundreds and our machine guns and artillery just got the range and we could see them falling by dozens."

The above correspondent is an Old Chorister of Badsey.

Vol 18, No 6, June 1915

Pte G Crisp wrote in a letter to his mother: "When you reply to this just tell me if Jeffries has sent any letters. I never saw him after Wednesday morning. the forcing of the Straits will not take long, but their concealed batteries caused us and the navy a lot of trouble."

Vol 18, No 7, July 1915

Pte C Jeffries writes to say that he is in hospital but expects to be out again soon.

Vol 18, No 8, August 1915

Pte C Jeffries writes to his sister from S Andrew’s Hospital, Malta, under date July 21: "Just a line to let you know I am wounded in the neck, shoulder and arm – only flesh wounds. I arrived here yesterday on the ship Gloucester Castle and am in the best of spirits. When we landed there were ladies there with cigarettes, matches, chocolates, biscuits and champagne. Then we were popped in motors and brought here. It was a fine ride through lovely wide streets and this is a lovely place …. I am going to have a look for Crisp when I can get out; S George’s Barracks is not far from here. I expect you received my last card. Well, I had just given that when I got hit. I was having a snipe and put my rifle down to give him the cards. When I got up again and had had a couple more shots a Turk started sniping at me so I let him have another and had just come down to reload when he got me or they did. How I got it in three places I don’t know, but I found myself in the bottom of the trench asking someone for a bandage. But it wasn’t fair; he had me when I wasn’t looking. Anyway I can’t grumble, I’ve had a good spell nearly three months." Pte Jeffries signs himself "Wounded but Happy".

Vol 18, No 9, September 1915

Mentioned in a letter from Pte C H Crane to Mr R Pethard: "I daresay you know that Jeffries is wounded, so that I’m the only lucky one out of all the Evesham District now."

Vol 18, No 10, October 1915

Pte C Jeffries’ friends are delighted to see him looking so well after all he has gone through.

Vol 19, No 10, October 1916

Received a parcel sent abroad from Badsey Soldiers’ Fund (money raised in February 1915 by a Whist Drive and half the proceeds of the Children’s Entertainment in March).

Vol 19, No 12, December 1916

Mentioned in T H Roberts’ letter to Mr Binyon: "I am much worried over poor old Jeff. It must nearly break his heart to think of home and you do think of it out there, and it is much harder for you when you have no home." [Roberts had lived at the Children’s Home at the Manor House.]

Vol 23, No 5, May 1918

Pte C Jefferies, who was wounded at the beginning of the Big Push, is in the Canadian Hospital at Taplow (where Pte J F Agg is employed) and going on well.

Vol 23, No 7, July 1918

Pte C Jeffries has been home on leave, crippled but looking well and cheerful. He has returned to hospital where he expects to be for some time.

Vol 23, No 8, August 1918

We congratulate Pte C Jeffries on his good fortune in being transferred to a hospital so near home as Abbey Manor.

 

PRIVATE BERT JELFS (born 9 Nov 1894, baptised Badsey)

Vol 19, No 10, October 1916

Received a parcel sent abroad from Badsey Soldiers’ Fund (money raised in February 1915 by a Whist Drive and half the proceeds of the Children’s Entertainment in March).

Vol 23, No 7, July 1918

Pte Bert Jelfs, of whom nothing had been heard for several weeks, was officially reported as missing on May 27. In reply to an enquiry by the vicar an officer on the staff of his Brigade writes to say that when last seen he was unwounded, and adds, "I am sure you will hear from him as a prisoner before long."

Vol 23, No 8, August 1918

On July 20 Mrs Warner heard from the British Red Cross Society that the name of Pte Bert Jelfs had come through in a list of Prisoners of War from Germany and that he was well. This was confirmed in a communication from Pte Jelfs himself received on July 30.

 

E JELFS

Vol 19, No 10, October 1916

Received a parcel sent abroad from Badsey Soldiers’ Fund (money raised in February 1915 by a Whist Drive and half the proceeds of the Children’s Entertainment in March).

 

CORPORAL FRANCIS JELFS (born 17 Jan 1895)

Vol 19, No 10, October 1916

Received a parcel sent abroad from Badsey Soldiers’ Fund (money raised in February 1915 by a Whist Drive and half the proceeds of the Children’s Entertainment in March).

Vol 22, No 12, December 1917

Cpl F Jelfs is in hospital at Lichfield suffering from rheumatism.

Vol 23, No 1, January 1918

Cpl F Jelfs is convalescent.

Vol 23, No 9, September 1918

Cpl F Jelfs is at the Wharncliffe War Hospital, Sheffield, recovering from a bullet wound in the shoulder received in France on August 23.

 

SIGNALLER A H JINKS

Vol 22, No 12, December 1917

Signaller A H Jinks has been invalided from the front and is in hospital at Perth.

Vol 23, No 1, January 1918

Signaller A Jinks is convalescent.

 

GUNNER FREDERICK CHARLES JONES (born 22 Jun 1894, baptised Badsey)

Vol 23, No 10, October 1918

Gunner F C Jones was admitted to hospital at Rouen on September 24. He was run over by an ammunition-wagon while serving close to the font-line and one of his legs has been badly fractured.

 

CORPORAL G E JONES

Vol 23, No 9, September 1918

The coffin [of Cpl C H Byrd], covered with the Union Jack, was carried shoulder-high from the deceased soldier’s home to the church, the bearer party, under Cpl G E Jones, and the firing party, under Sergt J Barnard, being made up of local members of the VTC.

 

SERGEANT A KEEN

Vol 22, No 12, December 1917

Sergt A Keen has been wounded by shrapnel in the back and leg. He is in hospital near Bristol and going on well.

Vol 23, No 1, January 1918

Sergt A Keen is progressing.

Vol 23, No 2, February 1918

Sergt A Keen is convalescent.

 

PRIVATE W KEEN

Vol 23, No 5, May 1918

Pte W Keen is reported a prisoner of war; communication has been received from him. One of Pte Keen’s comrades writes: "He was one of the best men that we had, always cool when we were in a hot corner. He put confidence in me a good many times when I felt a bit shaky."

Vol 23, No 6, June 1918

The only word approaching a grumble [of prisoner-of-war life] is to be found in Pte W Keen’s observation: "I have never had such a lazy month in my life."

 

PRIVATE JOHN POOLE KERR (baptised Badsey 1890

Vol 23, No 5, May 1918

Pte J Kerr has been wounded and is now convalescent.

 

PRIVATE A E KNIGHT (same as below?)

Vol 19, No 9, September 1916

Pte A E Knight has been wounded. He narrowly escaped with his life, the bullet entering by one cheek and passing out the other.

Vol 22, No 10, October 1917

We are sorry to learn that Private A E Knight, who was sent out to the front again a short time ago, has had to undergo a serious operation in consequence of his former severe wounds.

Vol 22, No 11, November 1917

We are sorry to learn that Pte A E Knight, who has already suffered so much from his wounds, is faced with the prospect of another operation.

 

PRIVATE ARTHUR ORSON KNIGHT (born 1 Oct 1896, baptised Badsey)

Vol 22, No 6, June 1917

Pte A O Knight, who was admitted to hospital in France "dangerously wounded" on April 28, is now in hospital in London and is, we are glad to learn, doing well.

Vol 22, No 7, July 1917

Private A O Knight has made good progress and has been transferred to a Convalescent Camp at Isleworth, though we understand a further operation may be necessary.

Vol 23, No 1, January 1918

Pte A O Knight is still quite incapacitated by the severe wounds received last April.

Vol 23, No 2, February 1918

Pte A O Knight, whose serious wounds have left him in a terribly enfeebled condition, is discharged from the army as from Feb 21st.

 

PRIVATE CHARLES KNIGHT (either born 15 Jul 1890 or 29 May 1884)

Vol 19, No 10, October 1916

Received a parcel sent abroad from Badsey Soldiers’ Fund (money raised in February 1915 by a Whist Drive and half the proceeds of the Children’s Entertainment in March).

Vol 22, No 8, August 1917

Private C Knight, of the Worcesters, came home on July 21st, completely incapacitated, for the time being at any rate, partly by the after-effect of wounds received as long ago as January 13th 1916, and partly as a result of his terrible experiences at the front. When he was wounded he had only just recovered from gas-poisoning. He was nursed in the first instance at Boulogne, and afterwards at the Norfolk War Hospital from which he was sent to Sheringham for rest and change. After a few days’ leave in April 1916, he had a relapse and was sent for treatment to the 3rd General Hospital at Wandsworth, where he remained until last month when he was given his discharge to take effect on August 3rd. His health seems to have improved slightly since his return home and we trust he may eventually make a complete recovery. Private Knight volunteered for service in November 1914 but was rejected. A second application in January 1915 was successful and he was sent to the front after two months’ training.

 

LANCE-CORPORAL J E KNIGHT

Vol 18, No 2, February 1915

We are glad to be able to record a bigger yield from the YMCA box placed in Badsey Church. Private J E Knight, writing from Fowey, says: "People can’t imagine the good the YMCA is doing. Such places as they provide are a perfect God-send to soldiers who try to lead a straight life .… When the temporary tent erected at Norton was wrecked about a month ago, the YMCA at once built a more substantial one at a cost of £300."

Vol 18, No 4, April 1915

All our choirmen who are serving with the Colours have had a "rise". L Sparrow, W Sparrow and J E Knight have been made Lance-Corporals.

Vol 18, No 10, October 1915

Corpl J E Knight, writing to the Vicar under date Sep 15th says: "I thought you might like to know that both L Sparrow and JE are in the best of health and spirits so far. We are now in the firing line, with the Turks about 800 to 1,000 yards in front of us. There is not much firing going on in the day time, but we keep sniping at each other most nights …. I went out on patrol with two men last night, when a few stray shots came whistling through the air a bit tto near to be comfortable …. I am afraid I cannot tell you much news as you don’t see a lot in the day time, and at night of course you have got to listen pretty keenly as the Turk is a wily customer …. If there are still any slackers left in Badsey, tell them to hurry up or they may be too late to take a hand in the World’s Greatest War – and when it is all over they won’t like to talk about it."

Vol 18, No 12, December 1915

Now in hospital in England.

Vol 19, No 1, January 1916

Corpl J E Knight, who is in hospital in Manchester, still makes but slow progress.

 

SERGEANT JOSEPH KNIGHT (born 2 Jan 1890)

Vol 19, No 10, October 1916

Received a parcel sent abroad from Badsey Soldiers’ Fund (money raised in February 1915 by a Whist Drive and half the proceeds of the Children’s Entertainment in March).

Vol 23, No 5, May 1918

Sergt Joseph Knight is in hospital at Lyme Regis slowly recovering from the effects of a kick from a horse.

 

PRIVATE SIDNEY KNIGHT (born 9 Jun 1895)

Vol 21, No 4, April 1917

Private Sidney Knight has been wounded but was able to remain on duty.

Vol 22, No 5, May 1917

Corp S V Knight is in hospital abroad.

 

PRIVATE THOMAS KNIGHT

Vol 23, No 5, May 1918

Pte T Knight has been wounded and is now convalescent.

Vol 23, No 6, June 1918

Pte T Knight is in hospital in France suffering from influenza and an injured ankle.

Vol 23, No 7, July 1918

Pte T Knight has been discharged from hospital.

Vol 23, No 9, September 1918

Pte T Knight, of Badsey, who used to work on land close to Col Barton’s, attended the funeral [of Colonel Bernard Barton] in the capacity of bandsman.

Vol 23, No 12, December 1918

On November 9, Pte T Knight’s mother received two letters from France, one stating that he had been admitted to the 26th General Hospital on November 3 suffering from severe gas-poisoning, and the other informing her that he passed away on November 6 and would be buried in the British Cemetery at Etaples. Pte Knight, who had seen two years’ service, was home a year ago, was wounded last May, and was expecting to get leave just about the time his death occurred. A memorial service was held at Badsey on November 19.

He appears on the Commonwealth War Graves Commission Debt of Honour Register.

 

W KNIGHT

Vol 19, No 10, October 1916

Received a parcel sent abroad from Badsey Soldiers’ Fund (money raised in February 1915 by a Whist Drive and half the proceeds of the Children’s Entertainment in March).

 

MR LEES-MILNE

Vol 17, No 12, December 1914

Mr Lees-Milne has taken his larger car to Winchester, where he is busily employed in ambulance work.

 

CORPORAL R C LEWIS

Vol 23, No 6, June 1918

It is with much regret that we learn of the death in action of Cpl R C Lewis, who was assistant master of Badsey Council School. He first came to Badsey in March 1914, and though but a short time here, he had formed a very real affection for the place and school, and when on leave he always made a point of visiting Badsey. In January 1915 he left his life’s work and all that a man holds dear in response to Lord Kitchener’s appeal for volunteers for the defence and honour of our country. He enlisted in the Battalion of the Gloucester Regiment and saw active service in France, and then Italy. On the 25th April 1918, while the battalion was holding part of the Italian front, Cpl Lewis met his death by a shell. Much sympathy is felt for his parents who lose the elder of their two children. A memorial service was held on Wednesday 15th May, in the Parish Church, when many of his old scholars were present, as well as Managers and staff of the school.

He appears on the Commonwealth War Graves Commission Debt of Honour Register.

 

CHARLES HERBERT LIDSEY (born 3 Oct 1893, baptised Badsey)

Vol 19, No 10, October 1916

Received a parcel sent abroad from Badsey Soldiers’ Fund (money raised in February 1915 by a Whist Drive and half the proceeds of the Children’s Entertainment in March).

 

CORPORAL ARTHUR HENRY LOGAN McDONALD (born 17 May 1898)

Vol 19, No 8, August 1916

Cpl McDonald has been wounded, his wounds of a very severe character, but he is now in England, and we are glad to know, going on well.

Vol 19, No 9, September 1916

We regret to learn that Corpl McDonald is still far from convalescent.

Vol 20, No 2, February 1917

Cpl McDonald is, we are sorry to learn, quite incapacitated and is making little, if any, progress. We trust the next news of him may be better.

Vol 22, No 10, October 1917

A Memorial service was held at Badsey on September 19th for Private Arthur H L McDonald, who was killed in France on August 16th. Pte McDonald, who was a grandson of our late schoolmaster, was well-known in Badsey, where he spent his boyhood, and was one of whom those who knew him have none but the happiest memories. Enlisting in the King’s Liverpool Regiment he was subsequently transferred to the Machine Gun Corps and was carrying his gun when he fell. His last words were, "Take the gun, Corporal, I’m hit," from which it would appear that his death was happily almost instantaneous. In the course of a letter to Private McDonald’s mother his Company Commander says: "You may be very proud of your son. No man has behaved more heroically since the beginning of the war then he did on the day he met his death."

He appears on the Commonwealth War Graves Commission Debt of Honour Register.

 

PRIVATE WILLIAM J MALIN (born 29 Nov 1897)

Vol 19, No 8, August 1916

Pte W Malin has been wounded, but he is now in England, and we are glad to know, going on well.

Vol 22, No 7, July 1917

Private William J Malin, who was wounded over a year ago, has been gassed in France. Thanks to the wonderful advance made by medical science in the treatment of such cases he has made a good recovery and is now in a convalescent camp.

Vol 23, No 1, January 1918

Pte W Malin is in hospital in France.

Vol 23, No 2, February 1918

Pte William Malin has again been in hospital but is now better.

Vol 23, No 4, April 1918

Pte W Malin is in hospital at Nottingham suffering from severe bruised caused through being buried by a shell.

 

GUNNER HENRY MARSHALL (born 1 Sep 1898)

Vol 23, No 8, August 1918

Gunner H Marshall was gassed on June 26 but has now been discharged from hospital and sent to a convalescent camp in France.

 

PRIVATE ERNEST WILLIAM KNIGHT MARSHALL (born 22 Apr 1893, baptised Badsey)

Vol 18, No 4, April 1915

On Monday 22nd March, news reached Badsey of the death of Private W Marshall. One of the earlier ones to enlist – almost one of the first – he had been in trenches almost continuously since Christmas. He was wounded in the terrible fighting at Neuve Chappelle and died of his wounds a few days later at one of the Base Hospitals.

On Tuesday 23rd March, a band consisting of members of the Southern Branch of the Worcestershire & District Change-Ringing Association rang a muffled peal of Stedman Triples (5040 changes) on our bells in 3hrs 20 mins; Mr J Barnard rang the tenor. The peal, which was a very fine piece of ringing, was in memory of those who had fallen in the war, and point was given to the event by the circumstance that only on the previous day news reached Badsey of the death of Private Marshall.

Vol 18, No 5, May 1915

There was a Memorial Service for the late Private E W Marshall at Badsey on April 15th.

He appears on the Commonwealth War Graves Commission Debt of Honour Register.

 

LIEUTENANT GEORGE MASON (born 10 Apr 1891, baptised Badsey)

Vol 18, No 10, October 1915

Corpl G Mason, who was invalided from the firing line on Sep 5th suffering from enteric, is in hospital at Alexandria. His illness has been of a serious nature but he is now much better.

Vol 18, No 12, December 1915

Now in hospital in England.

Vol 21, No 4, April 1917

We congratulate Lt G Mason who has been reported by his CO and Brigade Commander as having "distinguished himself in the field Feb 27/28".

Vol 22, No 6, June 1917

On May 28 Mr J Mason received news that his son, Lieut G Mason, was wounded on May 20, and a futher telegram stated that he had been missing since the same date. The profoundest sympathy is felt for Mr and Mrs Mason and Miss Barnard in their anxiety and sorrow, and we trust that reassuring news may yet be forthcoming of this gallant officer. It is an open secret that Lieut Mason was recommended for the Military Cross for the distinguished services to which we drew attention in our issue for April, and Pte G Crisp, writing apparently of the action on May 20, says, "in the opinion of all here he deserved the VC."

Vol 22, No 7, July 1917

We regret to say that Mr Mason has received no further official news of his son, Lieut G W Mason.

Vol 22, No 9, September 1917

Mr Mason has been officially informed that it must now be assumed that his son, Lt G Mason, was killed in action on May 20, and reports from private sources unhappily go to prove that this brave young officer made the great sacrifice on the date in question.

On August 29 a memorial service was held at Wickhamford which was attended by a large and representative congregation. The Vicar officiated and the Burial Service was feelingly rendered, the choir being augmented by the senior members of the Badsey choir.

The Vicar, in the course of a short address, said that whilst they were heroes all who laid down their lives for others, letters from France which he had been privileged to read showed that Lt Mason had established a very special claim to the title. His CSM wrote of him: "You will observe that I have used the words ‘gallant’ and ‘brave’. I have seen active service since August 1914, being a ‘regular’ soldier, but never have I come across an officer more devoted to his men, or more respected by his men. Whenever his name was mentioned it was always with respect and admiration." The vicar told how, on the night of February 27/28, his senior being put out of action by a bullet just as they went over the parapet, Lt Mason led his men through two lines of German trenches to the third line, and then carried a wounded man back to safety and was reported by his CO and Brigade Commander as having "distinguished himself in the field". There could be little doubt that it was in consequence of the initiative and bravery which he displayed on that occasion that he was chosen for the difficult and dangerous task which cost him his life – a task described by his CSM as "one that called for pluck, endurance and capable leadership". "It will be some consolation to you," the CSM went on to say "to know that Lt Mason was selected for this duty, and I am positive, had he been spared to us, his good work would have been recognised and his name would have appeared amongst those awarded honours." And it was a double consolation when they knew him, as they did, for a good Christian, sincere in his religion but without any parade, devout in his communions (he would often walk over to Badsey for Holy Communion because his work at home prevented him communicating at Wickhamford), devoted to parents and home and altogether lovable. We must many of us feel that our lives were purchased all too dearly at the price of such lives as these. The Vicar concluded with the last two verses of Laurence Housman’s fine lines, entitled "The Winners":

O lads, dear lads, who were loyal and true,
The worst of the fight was borne by you,
So the word shall go to cottage and hall,
Our battles are won by the men that fall.

When peace dawns over the countryside,
Our thanks shall be to the lads that died.
O quiet hearts, can you hear us tell
How peace was won by the men that fell?

 

CAPTAIN THOMAS MASON (b 13 Nov 1894, baptised Badsey)

Vol 22, No 12, December 1917

We offer our heartiest congratulations to Cap T Mason on his rapid promotion.

Vol 24, No 3, March 1919

We heartily congratulate Capt T Mason upon whom His Majesty the King of the Belgians has confered the Croix de Guerre.

 

PRIVATE O MOISEY

Vol 19, No 9, September 1916

Pte O Moisey is in hospital at Rouen suffering from rheumatism.

 

PRIVATE WILLIAM GEORGE MOISEY (born 1 Aug 1899)

Vol 23, No 6, June 1918

Pte W Moisey has been wounded in the eye and is in hospital in France.

Vol 23, No 9, September 1918

Pte W Moisey is in hospital in France suffering from fever.

 

CORPORAL ARTHUR EDWARD MOORE (born 13 Dec 1899, baptised Badsey)

Vol 23, No 6, June 1918

Pte A E Moore (brother of Sergt W Moore), who sustained a head wound in France, is on light duty in England but still feeling the effects of his injuries.

Vol 23, No 10, October 1918

Pte Arthur Moore has been in hospital with throat trouble but is now well again.

 

CORPORAL ERNEST MOORE (born 29 Sep 1896, baptised Badsey)

Vol 22, No 9, September 1917

Corpl E Moore, son of Mr S Moore of Aldington, has been admitted into hospital in France, sick. The nature of his illness is not stated.

Vol 23, No 9, September 1918

Cpl E Moore, who is in Italy, received gunshot wounds in the face and hand on August 4. He is now in a convalescent camp.

 

SERGEANT WALTER MOORE (born 26 Dec 1892, baptised Badsey)

Vol 22, No 9, September 1917

We have to congratulate Sergt Walter Moore, brother of Corpl Moore, on being awarded the Parchment Certificate for Gallant Conduct and Devotion to Duty. The certificate states: "He was one of the a patrol which entered the German lines near Hooge, east of Ypres, on the night of 27/28 July 1917. The patrol obtained valuable information, but was eventually discovered by the enemy who opened heavy machine gun and rifle fire. Sergt Moore showed great coolness and presence of mind and was of greatest assistance to the patrol commander in collecting and guiding the patrol back to our lines." Sergt Moore is accumulating honours quickly, for he has since been awarded the DCM for meritorious conduct in the subsequent advance on July 31. Mr and Mrs Moore have every reason to be proud of their sons, three of whom are serving in the army and two in the navy.

Vol 23, No 5, May 1918

Mrs Moore, of Aldington, has heard that her son, Sergt W Moore, DCM, is wounded and a prisoner. The information was conveyed in a letter from the Chaplain, who adds: "As far as I can make out, his wound was not too serious …. We shall greatly miss him as he was a great soldier and did excellent work with the Battalion." Nothing further has been heard of Sergt Moore, probably owing to the fact that he is wounded.

Vol 23, No 6, June 1918

We are very sorry to learn that Sergt W Moore (brother of Pte A E Moore), DCM, who was reported wounded and a prisoner, has now been posted as missing from some date "between Mar 23rd and 28th". We trust that reassuring news of him may soon be received.

Vol 23, No 7, July 1918

A postcard has been received from Sergt W Moore, DCM, dated May 25, stating that he is a prisoner in Germany and unwounded.

 

PRIVATE A J H MORRIS

Vol 23, No 1, January 1918

Pte A J H Morris, Coldstream Guards, who was reported missing after the Cambrai battle, is now know to be a prisoner of war in Germany.

Vol 23, No 5, May 1918

Pte A J Morris (brother-in-law of Sergt George Mustoe), who received 5 wounds and also sustained a broken finger before being taken prisoner, is still in hospital in Germany.

 

PRIVATE MORRIS

Vol 23, No 1, January 1918

Private Morris is wounded after the Cambrai battle.

 

PRIVATE GEORGE MOULBERRY (born 28 May 1888, baptised Badsey)

Vol 19, No 10, October 1916

Pte G Moulberry has been wounded and is in hospital at Norwich.

 

PRIVATE GEORGE MUSTOE

Vol 23, No 5, May 1918

Sergt George Mustoe (brother-in-law of Pte A J Morris), who was invalided to England some months ago is, we regret to learn, still quite helpless and making very little progress.

Vol 23, No 7, July 1918

Pte G Mustoe, who was discharged from the army as unfit for service on June 11, has suffered much for his country and is still in an exceedingly weak condition. We trust he will eventually make a good recovery but it will evidently be a long and tedious process.

 

PRIVATE GEORGE WILLIAM NIGHTINGALE (born 29 Nov 1897, baptised Badsey)

Vol 22, No 11, November 1917

Pte G W Nightingale is in hospital in Alexandria.

Vol 22, No 12, December 1917

Pte G W Nightingale is not progressing very satisfactory.

Vol 23, No 1, January 1918

Pte G W Nightingale is convalescent.

Vol 23, No 10, October 1918

Pte G W Nightingale has been gassed and was admitted to hospital at Abbeville on September 23.

 

PRIVATE WILLIAM FRANCIS NIGHTINGALE (born 13 Dec 1895, baptised Badsey)

Vol 19, No 11, November 1916

Pte William F Nightingale, who was wounded and gassed in September, has now re-joined his unit.

Vol 23, No 5, May 1918

Pte F W Nightingale has been wounded for the third time, but no particulars are to hand.

Vol 23, No 6, June 1918

The report from France to the effect that Pte W F Nightingale had been wounded was incorrect. A postcard has been received from him stating that he is a prisoner in Germany, unwounded and well.

Vol 24, No 2, February 1919

Pte F W Nightingale, who is an expert performer on the mouth-organ, played at a supper in the Parish Room on January 23rd, for returned prisoners-of-war and those local soldiers who had been discharged owing to exceptionally serious injuries.

 

CAPTAIN D S ORCHARD

Vol 18, No 1, January 1915

Captain D S Orchard, of the 8th Gurkhas, who was wounded in the severe fighting on December 20 when the enemy made a determined attack on the trenches held by our Indian troops, has returned to England.

 

J PERKES

Vol 19, No 10, October 1916

Received a parcel sent abroad from Badsey Soldiers’ Fund (money raised in February 1915 by a Whist Drive and half the proceeds of the Children’s Entertainment in March).

 

PRIVATE ALBERT CHARLES PERKINS (born 12 Apr 1897)

Vol 19, No 8, August 1916

Pte A Perkins has been wounded, but he is now in England, and we are glad to know, going on well.

Vol 19, No 10, October 1916

Received a parcel sent abroad from Badsey Soldiers’ Fund (money raised in February 1915 by a Whist Drive and half the proceeds of the Children’s Entertainment in March).

Vol 22, No 6, June 1917

Pte A G Perkins, who was again wounded on May 3, has now rejoined his unit.

Vol 23, No 1, January 1918

Cpl A C Perkins is in hospital in France and has had an operation for appendicitis.

Vol 23, No 2, February 1918

Cpl A C Perkins is progressing favourably. He is now in hospital at Leicester.

 

GUNNER JOHN PERKINS (born 16 Feb 1898, baptised Badsey)

Vol 22, No 10, October 1917

Gunner John Perkins, who only left England on September 3rd, was wounded in the left leg and right thigh on September 14th while helping to get the guns into action. He writes very cheerfully from a hospital in France, and there is reason to hope that his wounds are not very severe.

Vol 22, No 11, November 1917

Gunner J Perkins is now in hospital at Ware and expects to come home soon.

Vol 24, No 1, January 1919

Pte J Perkins is reported sick.

 

DRIVER ERNEST E PILLINGER

Vol 17, No 12, December 1914

Pte Pillinger (better known as "Ernest") writes from Norton Barracks to say that he likes it very much and expects to be drafted to Plymouth. "I thought it my duty to join," he says, "and so I did."

Vol 22, No 5, May 1917

Dvr E E Pillinger is in hospital abroad.

Vol 22, No 7, July 1917

Mr Stribblehill has received a letter from Driver E Pillinger, who is with the Salonika Forces, saying that he has again had to go into hospital with fever. We hope that by this time he is well on the way to recovery.

Vol 22, No 10, October 1917

Driver E Pillinger, who has had another attack of fever, writes to say he is better.

Vol 23, No 7, July 1918

Driver E Pillinger is back from Salonika. He is looking remarkably well considering the number of times he has been in hospital.

Vol 23, No 8, August 1918

Dvr E Pillinger, whose well-earned leave was sadly spoiled by several severe attacks of malaria, is a patient at Norton.

Vol 23, No 9, September 1918

He [Cpl C H Byrd] died on the evening of Sunday August 11, Dvr E Pillinger, who was also a patient at Norton, being with him when he passed away.

Vol 23, No 9, September 1918

The erection of the brass to Cpl Sparrow was kindly undertaken by Mr Stribblehill, assisted by Dvr E Pillinger.

 

PRIVATE A PORTER

Vol 17, No 12, December 1914

Private A Porter, RAMC, son of Mr J Porter of Badsey, is a prisoner of war in Germany.

Vol 18, No 8, August 1915

Mr & Mrs Porter are to be congratulated on the return of their son, Pte A Porter, from Germany. He has now gone back to duty at Aldershot.

Vol 19, No 10, October 1916

Received a parcel sent abroad from Badsey Soldiers’ Fund (money raised in February 1915 by a Whist Drive and half the proceeds of the Children’s Entertainment in March).

 

CORPORAL D POWELL

Vol 19, No 9, September 1916

Cpl D Powell has been missing since Easter.

He appears on the Commonwealth War Graves Commission Debt of Honour Register.

 

COL-SERGT CHARLES H ROBBINS (born 30 Aug 1884)

Vol 17, No 12, December 1914

Col-Sergt C H Robbins (acting Quartermaster-Sergt), killed in action November 7; son of Mr Robbins, of Wickhamford, and brother of Mrs Casswell, of Badsey; a native of Badsey and sometime a pupil at Badsey School.

 

PRIVATE T H ROBERTS

Vol 19, No 12, December 1916

The following extract from a letter from Pte T H Roberts (late of Badsey Manor House) to Mr Binyon tells its own pathetic story [Private lived at the Children’s Home at Badsey Manor.].

"I have been hit since the 21st of May, so I have had a long spell of hospital. I was hit fairly bad and thought I was going to die …. The doctor said I was a marvel for getting over it. I had nine large wounds and several small ones, also a broken leg. I got hit with a bomb; it exploded between my feet, so I had all my wounds on my legs except one which I had in the abdomen. that was the one that nearly finished me, but through a strong heart, a healthy body, and being merry through it all, I pulled through and am now nearly myself again. The doctor would come to me and say, ‘Let’s see you smile,’ and of course I would. I could not help it. Then he would tell me that I would be all right soon, being that I could smile and not worry over it. I was flat on the bed and could not raise my head without pain, so you can see I had a bad time of it. I am much worried over poor old Jeff. It must nearly break his heart to think of home and you do think of it out there, and it much harder for you when you have no home. I felt it now and then, but I fought it down and would not let it get the better of me. It makes you feel chippy when you see a fellow reading a letter from his mother. You see him smile, and then his face gets cloudy, but he looks at his letter again and then his smile comes again and stays there."

 

PRIVATE ROSSKOPF

Vol 23, No 12, December 1918

The Vicar was present at the funeral of Pte Rosskopf, the German soldier who was buried at Badsey on November 16 but, the deceased being a Roman Catholic, Monsignor Pattern officiated. The grave is near to those of our own three soldiers who have died within the last twelve months. The German soldiers from the Manor House Camp attended and, at the close of the ceremony, filed past the grave, each casting a handful of earth upon the coffin according to custom. There were some beautiful wreaths. Pte Rosskopf came from Bavaria and leaves a widow and two children.

Badsey Burial – Nov 16, Johann Rosskopf, aged 33 years

 

PRIVATE F SADLER

Vol 23, No 11, November 1918

At the very time that Pte H Sadler was lying ill at Gosforth, Mrs Jordan received news that another son, Pte F Sadler, had been wounded in the arm and head on October 6. He has reached England and is in hospital at Bristol where he appears to be progressing favourably. The greatest sympathy is felt for Mrs Jordan in her sorrow and anxiety.

 

PTE HARRY SADLER

Vol 22, No 11, November 1917

Pte H Sadler has been very severely wounded by shrapnel in the left thigh and in both feet. One great toe has been amputated and it was at one time thought he would lose a foot. He is in Netley Hospital and is progressing as well as can be expected.

Vol 22, No 12, December 1917

Pte H Sadler is still at Netley and going on as well as can be expected considering the serious nature of his wounds.

Vol 23, No 1, January 1918

Pte H Sadler is progressing. He is now in hospital at Romsey.

Vol 23, No 2, February 1918

Pte H Sadler is convalescent.

Vol 23, No 8, August 1918

Pte H R Sadler was discharged from the Army on July 3 "owing to wounds".

Vol 23, No 11, November 1918

We record with deep regret the death of Pte Harry Sadler which took place at the Northumberland War Hospital, Gosforth, on October 18. Pte Sadler only joined the colours on September 19 and his death was the result of pneumonia following influenza. He was buried at Badsey on October 23. Local members of the VTC formed a bearer-party but, in accordance with the wishes of Pte Sadler’s mother who desired the funeral to be as quiet as circumstances would allow, there were no volleys and no "Last Post". The choir, however, attended and sang the Psalm and a hymn in church and another hymn at the graveside, and the organist played the Dead March.

Badsey Burial – Oct 23, Harry Sadler, aged 18 years

Vol 24, No 5, May 1919

The military authorities have erected a wooden cross over the grave of the late Pte H Sadler in Badsey Churchyard.

He appears on the Commonwealth War Graves Commission Debt of Honour Register.

 

T SEARS

Vol 19, No 10, October 1916

Received a parcel sent abroad from Badsey Soldiers’ Fund (money raised in February 1915 by a Whist Drive and half the proceeds of the Children’s Entertainment in March).

 

CAPTAIN ARTHUR FRANCIS SAVORY SLADDEN (baptised Badsey 1884)

Vol 18, No 7, July 1915

Lieut A F S Sladden and Corpl G M Sladden have been in France for a considerable time.

Vol 24, No 1, January 1919

Capt A F Sladden, RAMC, who is now in charge of a Mobile Laboratory in France, is also to be congratulated on recently receiving from the French Government the decoration of the "Medaille des Epidemies" in recognition of his medical services during the war. Capt Sladden has served in France ever since the outbreak of war.

Vol 24, No 5, May 1919

The Vicar, in again appointing Mr Sladden as his warden [at the Easter Vestry], thanked him for his past services and took the opportunity of congratulating him on the success with which his sons, Major C E Sladden and Capt A F S Sladden, had served in the war. Major Sladden received the MC and DSO and been mentioned in despatches. Mr Sladden, in accepting office, thanked the Vicar for his congratulations and said that the fact that his sons’ services to their country had been deemed worthy of recognition was naturally very gratifying to him and, he thought, also to the parish; his sons took a deep interest in all that concerned Badsey and had long been intimately associated with the church and its services.

 

MAJOR CYRIL EDGAR SLADDEN (born 9 May 1890, baptised Badsey)

Vol 18, No 7, July 1915

Lieut C S Sladden is on his way to join the Mediterranean Expeditionary Force.

Vol 18, No 9, September 1915

Lieut C E Sladden, who was wounded at the Dardanelles on August 12th and is now in hospital at Malta, is progressing favourably.

Vol 18, No 10, October 1915

Lieut C E Sladden has rejoined his Battalion.

Vol 19, No 5, May 1916

Capt C E Sladden was "wounded" (for the second time) on April 9. The latest report is to the effect that he is "doing well".

Vol 21, No 4, April 1917

Major C E Sladden, whom we congratulate most heartily on his promotion, was wounded for the third time on Mar 10. We trust his injuries, particulars of which are not yet to hand, are not serious.

Vol 22, No 9, September 1917

Congratulations to Major C E Sladden on his "mention" in the recent dispatch from Mesopotamia.

Vol 23, No 3, March 1918

Hearty congratulations to Capt (Acting Major) C E Sladden on being awarded the MC for "general good service on the Field".

Vol 23, No 7, July 1918

Congratulations to Major C E Sladden on his promotion.

Vol 24, No 1, January 1919

We have to congratulate Major C E Sladden, MC, on receiving the DSO "for conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty". The Order of the Day (October 9) goes on to say that "he handled his battalion with marked ability and daring throughout the day under most difficult circumstances. When the troops on his left flank had withdrawn he skilfully extricate his command from an awkward position, inflicting heavy losses on the enemy who greatly outnumbered hi. His conduct was worthy of the highest praise." The above incident occurred at Baku early in September, when, owing to lack of support from Armenian troops, the British Force was placed in a dangerous position. Major Sladden was commanding the 9th Worcesters at that time in the absence of the Colonel.

Vol 24, No 5, May 1919

The Vicar, in again appointing Mr Sladden as his warden [at the Easter Vestry], thanked him for his past services and took the opportunity of congratulating him on the success with which his sons, Major C E Sladden and Capt A F S Sladden, had served in the war. Captain Sladden was awarded the Medaille des Epidemies for valuable medical work in France. Mr Sladden, in accepting office, thanked the Vicar for his congratulations and said that the fact that his sons’ services to their country had been deemed worthy of recognition was naturally very gratifying to him and, he thought, also to the parish; his sons took a deep interest in all that concerned Badsey and had long been intimately associated with the church and its services.

Vol 24, No 6, June 1919

Long life and happiness to Major Sladden and his bride who were married at All Saints, Great Marlow, on Saturday May 3. Had the wedding taken place at Badsey, as many hoped it might, it would certainly have proved one of the events of the year.

 

CORPORAL GEORGE MOWZILYON SLADDEN (baptised Badsey 1886)
[George's middle name is probably spelt incorrectly. It should be Mourilyan. The spelling given here may have been copied in error from his baptism.]

Vol 18, No 7, July 1915

Lieut A F S Sladden and Corpl G M Sladden have been in France for a considerable time.

 

MR J D SLADDEN

Vol 18, No 7, July 1915

Mr J D Sladden has volunteered for work on munitions.

 

PRIVATE W SOUTHERN

Vol 19, No 8, August 1916

Pte W Southern has been wounded (he appears to have had a miraculous escape), but he is now in England, and we are glad to know, going on well.

Vol 21, No 4, April 1917

Pte W Southern has again been wounded and is still in hospital.

Vol 23, No 1, January 1918

Pte W Southern, who has been wounded for the fourth time, is nearly well again.

 

LANCE-CORPORAL LOUIS HENRY SPARROW (born 7 Oct 1883)

Vol 18, No 2, February 1915

Private L H Sparrow, who is also stationed at Fowey [ie as J E Knight], has received a hearty welcome from the local band of Ringers and has already officiated in the belfry there.

Vol 18, No 4, April 1915

All our choirmen who are serving with the Colours have had a "rise". L Sparrow, W Sparrow and J E Knight have been made Lance-Corporals.

Vol 18, No 10, October 1915

Mentioned in J E Knight’s letter from Turkey to the Vicar of Sep 15th: "I thought you might like to know that both L Sparrow and JE are in the best of health and spirits so far."

Vol 18, No 11, November 1915

The Vicar has received a cheery letter.

Vol 19, No 1, January 1916

Invalided from Gallipoli; in hospital in Malta.

Vol 19, No 3, March 1916

Corpl L H Sparrow, writing from Malta to the Vicar under date February 1, says: "I have had a good stay at Malta and am feeling all the better for it. I have met G Evans; my word it has made a man of him. I think he is sure to be 6ft tall and he is looking well with it." With an eye to business, Corpl Sparrow adds: "They will soon be pea-picking here and have got their tomatoes planted out, and we have had young potatoes and carrots for a long time. It’s rather funny to see the way they plant things out here, anywhere between the rock where there is any soil."

Vol 19, No 5, May 1916

Cpl L H Sparrow seems to have succeeded in making himself indispensable to the authorities at Malta who are retaining his services there. We congratulate him on receiving the temporary rank of Sergt.

Vol 19, No 9, September 1916

Sergt Sparrow has been wounded; his injuries are not serious.

Vol 19, No 12, December 1916

It is with the deepest sorrow that we chronicle the death of Corpl L H Sparrow, who was killed by a shell which fell on his dug-out on the night of Sunday October 22. Corpl Sparrow, as our readers all know, was of the first married men to volunteer for service from Badsey and on every side one hears expressions of sympathy with his widow, his parents, and his little children who will soon be old enough to realise what the loss of a father means. A muffled peal was rung on the afternoon of November 14, and a memorial service was held in Badsey Church in the evening, when the congregation was so large that it was with difficulty that seats were found for all. The service, which was choral and was rendered with much feeling, was conducted by the Vicar, who spoke of the deceased soldier as follows: "I don’t think you will regard it as strange if I depart from my usual custom on occasions like the present and say a few words about him, affection and respect for whom have drawn us together tonight. Louis Henry Sparrow had been practically all his life so intimately associated with this church and its services that such a tribute is only his due. It is not an easy task – though one I willingly undertake – for ‘Lou’ Sparrow was one of my best friends in Badsey; but the difficulty is at least mitigated by the fact that he was one of whom I knew no ill. Upright, honest, clean in life and clean in speech, he was one of those who are verily the salt of our parishes. If he had never taken any active part in parochial affairs his private life would still have justified us in looking upon him as a man who we could ill afford to spare. I doubt if he was ever happier than when helping others – I speak that I do know – and it was this spirit of self-sacrifice which led him to offer his services to his country and eventually to lay down his life in her defence. Remember, that had he availed himself of the consideration shown to men situated as he was, he might still have been, like so many others, at home. But as soon as he saw where the finger of duty pointed, he never hesitated for one moment; he then and there made what proved to be ‘the great sacrifice’. I might speak of his services to this church, but you know what they were; how, as man and boy, he was a member of this choir, and a faithful member too, in his attendance, not only at services, but also at practices, for he had the honour of God’s House at heart. As a ringer also, he treated ringing not merely as a hobby, but as part of the service of the sanctuary, and, when he had taken part in the Sunday evening ringing he did not immediately turn his back on the church, but stayed for the service and took his place in the choir. And it was his interest in whatever work he took in hand and his devotion to duty that led him at last to a soldier’s grave. A good son, a good husband, a good father – if there were more fathers like him the keeping of the Fifth Commandment would be a simpler task than it sometimes is – a sincere Christian, a devout communicant, while we mourn his loss we can say tonight with holy, happy confidence:

Our hearts, our hopes are all with thee,
Our hearts, our hopes, our prayers, our tears,
Our faith, triumphant o’er our fears,
Are all with thee – are all with thee.

Corpl Sparrow’s colonel writes: "Much sympathy is expressed at his loss which is deeply felt throughout the battalion."

Vol 20, No 1, January 1917

A muffled peal for the late Corporal L Sparrow was rung at Badsey on Dec 3rd by members of the Worcestershire and Districts Association of Change Ringers, the following notice of which appears in the Association’s Report:

On Sunday Dec 3rd 1916, in 3 hours and 3 minutes, at the Church of S James, Badsey,

A PEAL OF GRANDSIRE TRIPLES
5040 changes
GROVES’ VARIATION OF PARKER’S TWELVE-PART
Tenor 15 cwt

HERBERT JORDAN Treble - FREDERICK JORDAN 5
HARRY MIDDLETON 2 - HENRY J PHIPPS 6
JOSEPH D JOHNSON 3 - *JAMES HEMMING 7
FRED J JOHNSON 4 - GEORGE MOISEY Tenor

Conducted by JAMES HEMMING
First peal on eight bells as conductor
First peal and first attempt

Rung with bells half muffled, as a token of respect to Corporal L H Sparrow, of the Worcestershire Regt, a highly respected member of the local band of ringers and a member of the Church choir, who was killed on Sunday October 22nd.

Vol 20, No 1, January 1917

In a letter from France, Private Emms wrote, saying of Corpl Sparrow that "he will be very much missed in dear old Badsey Church".

Vol 23, No 9, September 1918

A brass bearing the following inscription has been placed over the late Cpl L H Sparrow’s seat in the chancel of Badsey Church:

TO THE DEAR AND HONOURED MEMORY
OF
LOUIS HENRY SPARROW,
CORPORAL, WORCESTERSHIRE REGIMENT,
FOR 24 YEARS A MEMBER OF THE CHOIR
OF THIS CHURCH AND FOR 14 YEARS ONE
OF THE BAND OF RINGERS,
WHO WAS KILLED IN ACTION AT
GUEUDECOURT, FRANCE, OCTOBER 22ND, 1916,
AGED 33 YEARS.

"LORD, I HAVE LOVED THE HABITATION OF THY
HOUSE, AND THE PLACE WHERE THINE HONOUR
DWELLETH."

The erection of the brass to Cpl Sparrow was kindly undertaken by Mr Stribblehill, assisted by Dvr E Pillinger.

He appears on the Commonwealth War Graves Commission Debt of Honour Register.

 

LANCE-CORPORAL WILLIAM SPARROW (born 10 Oct 1878)

Vol 18, No 4, April 1915

All our choirmen who are serving with the Colours have had a "rise". L Sparrow, W Sparrow and J E Knight have been made Lance-Corporals.

 

PRIVATE GEORGE TAYLOR

Vol 19, No 12, December 1916

Miss E Sladden has received from Pte Geo Taylor, who is a prisoner-of-war at Friedrichsfeld, a card of thanks for the parcel sent by the Sunday Scholars of Badsey and Wickhamford. The contents were in good condition and, as this was one of the last parcels to be sent, it may be assumed that the others have also been received.

 

CORPORAL JOHN TAYLOR (born 30 Jul 1891)

Vol 23, No 6, June 1918

Cpl J Taylor, who has been badly gassed, is in hospital at Nottingham and doing well.

Vol 23, No 7, July 1918

Cpl J Taylor is still in hospital at Nottingham. His progress is very slow.

Vol 23, No 9, September 1918

Cpl J Taylor is now much better and hopes soon to be discharged from hospital.

 

CORPORAL THOMAS HENRY TAYLOR (born 11 Jun 1883, baptised Badsey)

Vol 19, No 10, October 1916

Received a parcel sent abroad from Badsey Soldiers’ Fund (money raised in February 1915 by a Whist Drive and half the proceeds of the Children’s Entertainment in March).

Vol 23, No 1, January 1918

T Taylor is in hospital in France suffering from dysentery.

Vol 23, No 2, February 1918

Cpl T Taylor (whose rank, owing to a printer’s error, was omitted last month) is well again.

Vol 23, No 7, July 1918

Cpl T Taylor, who has been wounded in the right shoulder, is in hospital at Winchester and making good progress.

 

SAPPER W H TAYLOR

Vol 23, No 4, April 1918

Sapper W H Taylor is in a rather weak state of health and is in the Philadelphia (US) General Hospital, No 16, Le Treport.

Vol 23, No 12, December 1918

Sapper W H Taylor has again been invalided to England and is in hospital at Leicester.

 

PRIVATE F TURNER

Vol 22, No 11, November 1917

Pte F Turner, AVC, has had a second attack of fever at Salonika but is now convalescent.

 

GUNNER ALBERT JAMES TYLER (born 25 Mar 1897)

Vol 23, No 1, January 1918

Gunner A J Tyler, RGA, who was reported missing after the Cambrai battle, is now know to be a prisoner of war in Germany.

 

CORPORAL GEOFFREY WALKER

Vol 23, No 12, December 1918

Miss K Walker has been officially informed that her brother Corpl Geoffrey Walker, has been missing since October 14. We sincerely hope she may soon have reassuring news.

 

J WALKER

Vol 19, No 10, October 1916

Received a parcel sent abroad from Badsey Soldiers’ Fund (money raised in February 1915 by a Whist Drive and half the proceeds of the Children’s Entertainment in March).

 

CORPORAL HARRY WALTERS (born 20 Nov 1887)

Vol 23, No 1, January 1918

Cpl H Walters, who was wounded in the left hand with shrapnel on Dec 5th, is in hospital at Etaples and is going on well.

Vol 23, No 2, February 1918

Cpl H Walters is well again.

Vol 23, No 4, April 1918

Cpl H Walters is in hospital in Nottingham suffering from a poisoned hand.

 

PRIVATE THOMAS WALTER WARMINGTON (born 20 May 1893, baptised Badsey)

Vol 23, No 5, May 1918

Pte T Warmington, who was taken ill on the Cambrai front, is now well again and expects soon to return to the front.

 

JAMES WASLEY (born 14 Dec 1883, baptised Badsey)

Vol 19, No 10, October 1916

Received a parcel sent abroad from Badsey Soldiers’ Fund (money raised in February 1915 by a Whist Drive and half the proceeds of the Children’s Entertainment in March).

 

GUNNER I G WILCOX

Vol 23, No 4, April 1918

Yet another Wickhamford man has laid down his life for his country, Gunner I G Wilcox having been killed by a shell in France on Mar 12. In a letter to Mrs Wilcox, which has already appeared in the Evesham Journal, Major Nelson speaks in the very higest terms of this gallant soldier. A memorial service was held at Wickhamford on March 23rd.

 

GUNNER CHARLES WILLIAM WILKINS (baptised Badsey 1894)

Vol 22, No 11, November 1917

Gunner C W Wilkins, RFA, has recently undergone an operation in India for the removal of a tumour from which, we understand, he was suffering before he joined the colours. He was in Mesopotamia when an operation was found to be necessary and was promptly sent back to India. When he last wrote home he was going on well and expected soon to be sent to the hills.

Vol 22, No 12, December 1917

Gunner C W Wilkins is better.

 

PRIVATE THOMAS WILLOUGHBY (born 18 Jan 1885, baptised Badsey)

Vol 22, No 6, June 1917

Mrs Willoughby, late of Wickhamford, was informed on May 8 that her son, Pte Thomas Willoughby, of the Worcesters, was killed in action in France on April 24. An officer of the regiment writes of him that "he died doing his duty".

 

STAFF-SERGEANT JOSEPH CECIL WILSON (born 9 Mar 1894, baptised Badsey)

Vol 22, No 10, October 1917

Staff-Sergt J C Wilson is reported as having been admitted to hospital at Amara on July 27th, suffering from sickness, the nature of which was not stated.

Vol 22, No 11, November 1917

Pte J C Wilson has rejoined his unit.

Vol 24, No 1, January 1919

Sergt J Wilson is reported sick.

 

PRIVATE THOMAS JOHN WILSON (born 5 Nov 1896, baptised Badsey)

Vol 23, No 5, May 1918

Pte T Wilson is reported a prisoner of war; communication has been received from him.

 

PRIVATE E YEATES

Vol 22, No 12, December 1917

Pte E Yeates is in hospital in France with shrapnel wounds in the right arm and left leg.

Vol 23, No 1, January 1918

Pte E Yeates is in hospital at Banbury and progressing satisfactorily.

Vol 23, No 2, February 1918

Pte E Yeates is progressing favourably.

Vol 23, No 10, October 1918

Pte E Yeates was wounded on September 26, but remained on duty.

Vol 23, No 12, December 1918

By the same post that brought Mrs Knight’s two letters, Mrs E Yeates received the sad news that her husband, who had been missing since September 29, was reported "killed in action or died of wounds" on or near that date. Pte Yeates joined the colours in January 1917, and went to France the following April. He was severely wounded in November 1917 and, after being in hospital at Oxford and Banbury, rejoined his regiment in April last, returning to France in August. A memorial service was held at Badsey on November 20.

He appears on the Commonwealth War Graves Commission Debt of Honour Register.

 

PRIVATE WILLIAM HENRY YEATES (born 4 Apr 1898)

Vol 22, No 11, November 1917

Pte W H Yeates, who was admitted to hospital in France on October 4 suffering from a gunshot wound in the side, has now apparently rejoined his unit.

Vol 23, No 5, May 1918

Pte W Yeates has been wounded and is now convalescent.

Vol 23, No 9, September 1918

Pte W H Yeates was wounded, for the fourth time, on August 22. He is in hospital at Rouen.

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

GENERAL WAR NEWS

Vol 17, No 10, October 1914

The list in Badsey Church of those "on service" and more or less intimately connected with the parish contains 39 names, and that in Wickhamford Church 18 names. Seventeen of the former and ten of the latter may be claimed as "local recruits", ie residents not previously in the service.

Vol 19, No 10, October 1916

Badsey Soldiers’ Fund – From money raised in February 1915 by a Whist Drive and half the proceeds of the Children’s Entertainment last March, 34 parcels have been sent abroad to soldiers. Several more parcels will be sent shortly to others now abroad. Over 40 lb of wool had been knitted up into socks, mufflers, mittens, etc, and 60 pairs of socks have been sent away. Other garments have also been made.

Most of the parcels have arrived safely and been acknowledged, and were evidently much appreciated. A few soldiers were in hospital when the parcels arrived, in which case the contents were as a rule distributed among friends in their respective companies.

Vol 19, No 10, October 1916

Badsey and Wickhamford Sunday School – About 120 children were present at the treat given on September 21, which was in every way a success…. The scholars were invited to bring gifts for the Worcestershire prisoners of war, as a result of which 14 parcels, each weighing about 5 lb and of the average value of about 5/-, have been dispatched to men of the Worcester regiment whose names were obtained from the depot at Worcester. Every parcel contained: cigarettes, biscuits, cocoa, soap, tinned meat or fish, tea, coffee, milk, or café-au-lait.

Vol 22, No 5, May 1917

On Thursday evening, March 15, there was "A Solemn Music" at Worcester Cathedral in memory of those who have laid down their lives in the service of their country. Mr Laurence Binyon’s poem, "For the Fallen", which appeared in The Times about two years ago, was sung by the Fesitval Choral Society, with the assistance of the Cathedral Choir, to music composed by Sir Edward Elgar, Sir Edward himself conducting.

Vol 23, No 12, December 1918

The news that the fighting had ceased was received with grateful satisfaction by all, but the joy of many was sadly marred by the arrival of sad news from the front [the deaths of Pte T Knight, Pte E Yeates and Pte J S Cull]. As soon as possible after the signing of the armistice became known, the bells of Badsey rang out a merry peal. Six of those bells must have celebrated many a victory before, but they have surely never been listened to with greater thankfulness. On Tuesday evening, November 12, a full congregation assembled in Badsey Church to return praise to Almighty God, "the only giver of all victory", for victory and "deliverance from those great and apparent dangers wherewith we were compassed." The Vicar officiated, Mr Sladden read the lesson, Mr T H Knight was at the organ, and there was a full choir. The psalms were 46 and 76, the hymns were "Praise , my soul, the King of Heaven", "All people that on earth do dwell", "O God, our help" and "For all the Saints", and the lesson was Isaiah lxi. The Te Deum was sung before the blessing, and after the blessing the first and last verses of the National Anthem were sung. The bells were again rung both before and after the service and the ringers are to be congratulated on their excellent performance after an enforced abstention from practice for over four years.

A similar service was held at Wickhamford the following evening.

Vol 24, No 1, January 1919

All our prisoners of war have now reached home and look fairly well considering their experiences. Most of them had a terrible time during the earlier days of the captivity and all agree in reporting a steady improvement in conditions as time went on.

Vol 24, No 2, February 1919

Our returned prisoners-of-war, together with one or two of our local soldiers who had been discharged owing to exceptionally serious injuries, were entertained to supper in the Parish Room on Thursday January 23rd. The little function was organised by Mrs H Johns and Mrs J E Knight who collected the necessary funds and, with the help of a few willing assistants, prepared bot the room and the repast. Their labours, which were by no means light, were fully rewarded, for all those present appeared to enjoy themselves immensely and, the money subscribed being more than was required, the balance was divided among the guests. The proceedings were enlivened with musical selections, the principal contributors being Miss C Johns, Pte F W Nightingale who is an expert performer on the mouth-organ, and the Vicar.

Vol 24, No 4, April 1919

A scheme has been put forward for a War Memorial for Wickhamford, and two such schemes for Badsey. As circulars have been left at every house giving full particulars of these proposals, it is quite unnecessary to go into details here, and we have no intention of "appealing" for subscriptions which should be in the strictest sense voluntary. We may, however, be allowed to express a hope that those who do intend to contribute towards any of these memorials will not fail to fill up and send in the forms provided, so that the work of those charged with carrying out the different schemes may not be unnecessarily hindered.

Vol 24, No 5, May 1919

On several occasions lately about 50 prisoners of war from Badsey Manor House have attended the 11 o’clock Sunday service at Badsey Church, and there was a special celebration of the Holy Communion for them on Low Sunday when 47 communicated. The Bishop sanctioned the service and also the use of the SPCK German translation of the Book of Common Prayer.

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

If you are searching for a particular person try the alphabetical index of people who have lived in Badsey and Aldington. Here is an article about German prisoners of war at the Badsey Manor House in 1918. See also articles from the Parish Magazine 1908 - 1914.

Edited by Maureen Spinks

See also Wickhamford men in World War I


Updated 10 September 2014. Contact email: History@Badsey.net