Enclosure map project

Footpath: Badsey Road to Badsey Undergrounds

Badsey website home page

Roads and paths in Badsey and Aldington

Link to WCC GIS map
Click on the image above to see this path on the Worcestershire County Council GIS website with the digitised historical maps. Click on the image below to view the original enclosure map.

enclosure map

OpenStreetMap

Photos taken 2006.

BADSEY ROAD TO BADSEY UNDERGROUNDS
(Aldington Map Parcel No E)

Grid Reference: 065437 to 068431

In 1807, at the time that the Aldington Enclosure Map was drawn, a track led south from the Bretforton Turnpike Road (present-day Badsey Road) and exists to this day as a public right of way (it forms part of a path which leads to Wickhamford and Murcot). It is shown on the Enclosure Map as a dotted line, but was actually a fairly substantial track: "And also one other Private Carriage Road and Driftway of the like breadth of twenty feet branching out of the Turnpike Road and leading from Bengworth to Bretforton on the South side thereof opposite the osier bed belonging to the said George Day and passing in a South direction to a gate at the entrance into an old Inclosure called Jarretts Piece belonging to John Jones which Road is set out and allotted and Awarded as and for a Private Carriage Road and Driftway for the time being for the use of the several Owners and Occupiers of the Allotment through and over which the same passes and for the use of the Owners and Occupiers of the said old Inclosures to which the same leads."

There is evidence that the land in this area was occupied in Roman times. A Farming Survey map of 1944 shows the tenants for this area of land which was held under the Evesham Custom.

Here is a description of a walk along the path today. [LINK TO BE MADE AVAILABLE IN DUE COURSE.] The following paragraphs give an historical description of ownership of the land over which the path passes.

Jarrett’s Piece or Under Badsey (Aldington Map Z016 and Z017)

This land, west of Badsey Brook, has been known since the early 20th century as Badsey Undergrounds or Under Badsey (a name which had been given in the 19th century and earlier only to the land to the south), but it was, at one time, known as Jarrett’s Piece or Ground after William Jarrett (1608-1681), the tenant in the mid 17th century. In 1807, at the time of the Aldington Enclosure Act, Jarrett’s Piece amounted to two fields comprising 18a 1r 16p and 7a 3r 19p. John Jones had bought the land for £1128 in 1803 from Thomas, Lord Foley, Baron of Kidderminster, whose family had owned Aldington Farm and the manor of Aldington throughout the 18th century. The tenant in 1803 had been Edward Laugher and it was then referred to as Gerrards Piece, presumably a corruption of Jarrett. John’s brother, Joseph, bought the land to the south on the same day. In 1833, John Jones sold the land to his niece, Ann Collett (née Wheeler), the daughter of his sister Mary and the widow of John Collett. After her death in 1837, the land passed to William Collett, the half-brother of her husband John. After his death in 1850, the land passed at his bequest to Edward Appelbee. In 1877, Edward’s widow, Elizabeth Appelbee, and her son Thomas sold the land to John Pickup Lord and it became part of what was known as the Wickhamford estate (although it covered land in Badsey, Aldington and Bengeworth, as well as Wickhamford). It was put up for auction in 1930, with the tenant farmers being given the option to buy, this area of land forming Lots 28, 29 and 30. Two strips of land between Lots 29 and 30 had already been sold prior to 1930: the more northerly one to George Harwood and the more southerly one to A W Perkins.

 

Badsey Undergrounds
(Aldington Map Z018 and Z019)

In 1807, at the time of the Aldington Enclosure Act, this plot of land comprised two old enclosures owned by Joseph Jones. The acreage amounted to 11a 1r 4p and 9a 3r 27p. Joseph Jones had bought the land in 1803 from Thomas, Lord Foley, Baron of Kidderminster, who had owned Aldington Farm and the manor of Aldington throughout the 18th century. The tenant then had been Edward Laugher and it was referred to as Under Badsey Ground, a name which still exists to this day. There was a clause, however, which said that Lord Foley and his heirs and agents retained the right to pass over the road which crossed the land "of sufficient breadth … to go and pass with horses, wagons, etc at this and their free will and pleasure without interruption by Joseph Jones." Joseph Jones mortgaged the land from 1841, the mortgagee being William Collett; in 1848, William Collett took over the ownership. William Collett died in 1850. On 10th July 1865, at the Cross Keys Inn, Evesham, following the death of William Collett’s widow, Mary, the land was sold at public auction: "All those Two Valuable Closes of arable land, called the Under Badsey Grounds, containing 21a 3r 38p or thereabouts, situate in the hamlet of Aldington, in the parish of Badsey, and now in the occupation of Mrs Inglis. This land is of the highest quality, in a well-known gardening district, and adjoins the estates of Mr Darwin and Mr Lord, which with Badsey Brook and Badsey Lane, form the boundaries of the lot. Lying close to the Evesham Gardens, this excellent land can easily compete with the best of them for fertility, while it enjoys the advantage over the Evesham land of exemption from their local rates. These closes are watered by Badsey Brook, and have a belt of pasture against the side of the stream." Mary Collett had left the land in her will to her nephews, Thomas Yardington Tovey and William Tovey of Church Lench, to sell as soon as was expedient after her death. It was bought by John Pickup Lord and became part of what was known as the Wickhamford estate (although it covered land in Badsey, Aldington and Bengeworth, as well as Wickhamford). It was put up for auction in 1930 as Lots 26 and 27, with the tenant farmers being given the option to buy. However, a plan of 1934 reveals that it was not sold and it was not until 1950 that this, and the remainder of the Wickhamford estate (amounting to 561 acres in total) was sold to Christ Church, Oxford, by John Arthur Lord and Frederick Maurice Lord, the grandsons of John Pickup Lord.

Where they are available, links are provided to historical information about places and buildings. This index of roads and paths in Badsey and Aldington was compiled as part of the Badsey Society Enclosure Map Project. The house numbers and names are correct as at May 2006. Every care has been taken to provide accurate information, but if you are aware of any error, please contact us. If you wish to provide a history or memories of an individual house on this road, please email History@badsey.net.


Badsey is a large working village in Worcestershire, England. Aldington is a smaller village in the same parish. The Badsey Society exists to promote the understanding and study of the villages and the surrounding area. The Enclosure Map Project traces the development of the villages since the publication of enclosure maps in 1807 and 1812. The Society is grateful for a grant received from the Local Heritage Initiative.
Updated 12 July 2010. Email History@badsey.net.