Enclosure map project

Bretforton Road, Badsey (B4035)

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Roads and paths in Badsey and Aldington

Link to WCC GIS map
Click on the image above to see this road on the Worcestershire County Council GIS website with the digitised historical maps. Click on the image below to view the original enclosure map.
enclosure map

Photos taken 2006. Aerial photos: a6989 a6996 a7078 a7194 a7199 a7205

BRETFORTON ROAD

Bretforton Road is so-called because it is the main road to Bretforton, the neighbouring village to the east. At the time of the Badsey Enclosure, it was referred to as follows: "One public Turnpike Road of the width of forty feet marked Number 1 on the surveyor’s map commencing at the Hamlet of Aldington and leading from the Town of Evesham aforesaid towards the Village of Bretforton in an Eastwardly direction and in its usual track until it enters the Parish of Bretforton aforesaid." The western part of Bretforton Road was, at that stage, part of Aldington; it did not become part of Badsey until 1921. Bretforton Road forms part of the B4035 which runs from Evesham to Banbury; the Badsey section of the road is nearly 1½ miles long.

In historic times, the land north of the road comprised two large fields: Nether Field and Hadshill Field, plus Bretforton Close just by the Bretforton boundary, and Claybrook between Nether Field and Hadshill Field. Nether Field extended from west of the present-day Birmingham Road (Banks Road and Oak Close as far as the present-day Number 99 Bretforton Road. The land nearer the brook was known as Lower Nether Field and the land further away was known as Upper Nether Field, which explained why a number of landowners at the time of enclosure had fields with the same names. Where landowners had a long strip of land running from the road to the brook, the field was known simply as Nether Field. Hadshill Field extended from the present-day number 105 to number 123 and the market garden land beyond. It also extended south of the road from the present-day number 42 as far as the parish boundary.

At the time of the Badsey Enclosure, the only development along this road was the house of Samuel Jelfs and some two parish cottages. After the Poor Law Act of 1834, the cottages were no longer needed and were sold in 1838; they were pulled down and five new cottages erected on the site. It is believed that Samuel Jelfs’ house was demolished some time in the latter part of the 19th century and a Some time in the early part of the 19th century, a turnpike house was built in what was then Aldington, and a toll bar placed across the road, just as the road turns westwards from Synehurst. The house was demolished in about the 1880s. To this day, older residents of the parish still refer to this area as The Pike although no remains of the turnpike would have existed in their lifetime. On the north side of the road, The Royal Oak Inn (now The Round of Gras) came into existence in the early part of the 19th century, as did a farm at Claybrook. A house was built at Netherfield in the 1870s. On the south side, a pair of semi-detached cottages, dated 1886, was built near the former parish cottagesreplaced it.

By the latter part of the 19th century, most of the land on the south side of the road (from the present-day Hither Green onwards) was in the ownership of the Byrd family, the most westerly part belonging to Thomas Byrd, the rest being acquired by siblings Sarah, William and Mary Byrd at various times. Sarah, William and Mary’s land passed by inheritance to their nephew, William Byrd (1841-1902). William Byrd got into financial difficulties and appeared in a debtors’ court in 1880; by the 1890s, William Smith, the Trustee, was entitled to all William Byrd’s land-holdings and began to sell of the land. Development began on the south side with Wickliffe House (number 66) and Cotswold Cottage (numbers 54 & 56) in 1890, Osborne Cottage (number 48A) in 1891, and Beulah House (number 64) in 1897. Thomas Byrd’s land was sold to the Stewart family, who conducted their market gardening business there for much of the 20th century.

Development on the north side began at the end of the 19th century with the building of Laburnam Villa (Number 45) but then proceeded at a fast rate in the first decades of the 20th century. Further development was able to take place on the north side of the road (in the westerly Aldington part) during the shortly before and during the First World War; this was made possible by the sale of the Ashwin estate in 1912 (which had previously belonged to the Reverend Thomas Williams).

Some paintings by John Bird of the Hither Green area of Bretforton Road portray the area as it was in the 1930s.

Numbers were given to the houses in about 1960. There is no number 24 (allowance was obviously made for a house to be built on the space between numbers 22 and 26, but in the event, Hither Green was built. Numbering finishes at 66 on the south side, then jumps to number 90 (one house); obviously allowance was made for further development, which so far has not happened. On the north side, there is no number 65; it was obviously assumed there might have been another house built next to Netherfield. There are no numbers 35, 37, 39, 41 and 43; again, allowance was made for development, but then Oak Close was built.

North Side - 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 15, 15A, 15B, 17, 17A, 19 (Aldington Map A019)

This part of Bretforton Road is on land which used to belong to Aldington until 1921. It was an old enclosure called Hither Parks which belonged to George Day, Lord of the Manor of Aldington, and formed part of Aldington Farm which he had bought from Lord Foley in 1805. In June 1806, a full year before the Aldington Enclosure Act was passed, The Reverend Thomas Williams entered into an agreement with George Day: "….. after reciting that the said Thomas Williams and George Day had each of them freehold estates in Aldington aforesaid and that the said Thomas Williams had also freehold estates in the parishes of Offenham and Badsey in the county of Worcester part of which lay adjoining to the estate of the said George Day situate in the hamlet of Aldington and reciting that the proprietors of lands in the hamlet of Aldington had it in contemplation to inclose the open and common fields and other commonable and waste land within the said hamlet and in case the said inclosure should take effect it would be much to the advantage of the said Thomas Williams and George Day to make exchanges of part of their said estates it was mutually agreed by and between the said parties thereto and their respective heirs executors and administrators that in case the said Inclosure should take effect the said Thomas Williams should receive in exchange for his lands in Aldington so much of the under-mentioned lands of the said George Day as should in the judgement of the Commissioner or Commissioners to be appointed for making the said Inclosure be a full equivalent to the said Thomas Williams for the lands and hereditaments in the said hamlet of Aldington ..…" In 1808, when the Aldington Enclosure Commissioners made their awards, the exchange with George Day was formally agreed and this plot of land was allotted to the Reverend Thomas Williams: "To and for the Reverend Thomas Williams, All those several pieces or parcels of old Inclosed Land next hereinafter described (that is to say), Black Bank Meadow containing five acres one rood and sixteen perches, Black Bank Ground containing six acres and four perches, Far Parks otherwise Flax Ground containing thirteen acres two roods and four perches, Hither Parks otherwise Flax Ground, containing thirteen acres three roods and twenty perches, which said four Closes adjoin to each other and contain thirty-eight acres three roods and four perches, bounded on the North by the Parish of Offenham, on the East by old Inclosures of Badsey, on the South by the Bretforton Turnpike Road, and on the West by the Closes called the Hanging Grounds belonging to the said George Day." After Reverend Williams’ death in 1829, it passed by inheritance to the Allies family, who then sold it in 1864 to Joseph Woodward, the agent of the estate. Woodward in turn sold the Aldington part of the estate in 1866 (lot 2) to William Henry Ashwin of Bretforton, whose grandfather, James, had bought the remaining part of Aldington Farm from George Day in 1808, so the estate was restored to its former size. It remained in the Ashwin family until 1912 when the land was split into smaller lots. Numbers 1, 3, 5, 7 and 9 form part of Lot 12; numbers 11, 13 and 15 form part of Lot 11; numbers 15A, 15B, 17 and 17A form part of Lot 10; number 9 forms part of Lot 9.

North Side – 19A, 21, 21A, 23, 23A, 23B, 25, 27, 29, 31, 33 (Aldington Map A018)

This part of Bretforton Road is on land which used to belong to Aldington until 1921. It was an old enclosure called Far Parks which belonged to George Day, Lord of the Manor of Aldington, and formed part of Aldington Farm which he had bought from Lord Foley in 1805. In June 1806, a full year before the Aldington Enclosure Act was passed, The Reverend Thomas Williams entered into an agreement with George Day: "….. after reciting that the said Thomas Williams and George Day had each of them freehold estates in Aldington aforesaid and that the said Thomas Williams had also freehold estates in the parishes of Offenham and Badsey in the county of Worcester part of which lay adjoining to the estate of the said George Day situate in the hamlet of Aldington and reciting that the proprietors of lands in the hamlet of Aldington had it in contemplation to inclose the open and common fields and other commonable and waste land within the said hamlet and in case the said inclosure should take effect it would be much to the advantage of the said Thomas Williams and George Day to make exchanges of part of their said estates it was mutually agreed by and between the said parties thereto and their respective heirs executors and administrators that in case the said Inclosure should take effect the said Thomas Williams should receive in exchange for his lands in Aldington so much of the under-mentioned lands of the said George Day as should in the judgement of the Commissioner or Commissioners to be appointed for making the said Inclosure be a full equivalent to the said Thomas Williams for the lands and hereditaments in the said hamlet of Aldington ..…". In 1808, when the Aldington Enclosure Commissioners made their awards, the exchange with George Day was formally agreed and this plot of land was allotted to the Reverend Thomas Williams: "To and for the Reverend Thomas Williams, All those several pieces or parcels of old Inclosed Land next hereinafter described (that is to say), Black Bank Meadow containing five acres one rood and sixteen perches, Black Bank Ground containing six acres and four perches, Far Parks otherwise Flax Ground containing thirteen acres two roods and four perches, Hither Parks otherwise Flax Ground, containing thirteen acres three roods and twenty perches, which said four Closes adjoin to each other and contain thirty-eight acres three roods and four perches, bounded on the North by the Parish of Offenham, on the East by old Inclosures of Badsey, on the South by the Bretforton Turnpike Road, and on the West by the Closes called the Hanging Grounds belonging to the said George Day." After Reverend Williams’ death in 1829, it passed by inheritance to the Allies family, who then sold it in 1864 to Joseph Woodward, the agent of the estate. Woodward in turn sold the Aldington part of the estate in 1866 (lot 2) to William Henry Ashwin of Bretforton, whose grandfather, James, had bought the remaining part of Aldington Farm from George Day in 1808, so the estate was restored to its former size. It remained in the Ashwin family until 1912 when the land was split into smaller lots. Numbers 19A and 21 form part of Lot 8; numbers 21A and 23 form part of Lot 7; numbers 23A, 23B, 25 and 27 form part of Lot 6; numbers 29, 31 and 33 form part of Lot 4.

North Side – 45 (Badsey Map G079 and part of road)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure which belonged to Elizabeth Ballard. It was called Nether Field and amounted to 3a 1r 38p. By 1866, when Edward Wilson sold the land to the east, it was in the ownership of Mrs Ingles. Laburnam Villa was built on the land in 1897. The road to Blackminster ran along what is now the western part of the property.

North Side – Round of Gras (Badsey Map G079 and G080)

The public house, now known as The Round of Gras but previously known as The Royal Oak, is situated partly on two old enclosures, both called Nether Field which, in 1812 at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, belonged to Elizabeth Ballard (it had previously belonged to Jones). The western part of the present-day building stands on a strip of land which amounted to 3a 1r 38p; the eastern part of the building and the car park stand on a strip of land which amounted to 3a 2r 10p. The inn was built some time in the mid 19th century. By 1866 the two strips were in the ownership of Mrs Ingles.

North Side – 49, 51, 53, 55, 57, 59 (Badsey Map G081)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure which belonged to Edward Wilson. It was called Nether Field and amounted to 3a 2r 34p 34p of arable land. On 23rd July 1866, Edward Wilson sold the land at an auction at The Northwick Arms Hotel, Evesham, in Lot 4 (the measurement was now given as 3a 2r 30p). Three pairs of semi-detached houses were built on the land in the early part of the 20th century.

North Side – 59A, 61, 61A, 61B, 63, 67, 69 (Badsey Map G082)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure which belonged to Edward Laugher. It was called Upper Nether Field and amounted to 7a 0r 8p. A map of 1864 attached to sales particulars for the adjoining field show that it was in the ownership of George Field. The land was then bought by William Smith who, in the 1870s, built a house called Netherfield on the land (present-day number 63, briefly called Swanmor in 2005, but now called Stewart House). Further housing was built in the 1960s when some of the Netherfield land was sold.

North Side – 71, 73, 75, 77, 79, 81 (Badsey Map G085)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure which belonged to Edward Savage. It was called Upper Nether Field and amounted to 2a 3r 9p. After Edward Savage’s death in 1819, it passed by inheritance to his great-nephew, Edward Appelbee. In 1864, Thomas Appelbee (Edward's son) unsuccessfully tried to sell this field, known as First Netherfield, together with the rest of the Appelbee estate. It was sold nearly 30 years later when the trustees of the will of Thomas Appelbee and his sister, Mrs William Gibbs (Edward Appelbee’s children), sold it at a sale at the King’s Head Hotel, Evesham, on 6th July 1891. This was part of Claybrook Farm which comprised just under 69 acres. Arthur Savory bought the whole of Claybrook Farm, including this field, but sold it again in 1897. Three pairs of semi-detached houses were built on the land in the early part of the 20th century.

North Side – 83, 85, 87 (Badsey Map G087)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure which belonged to William Wilson. It was called Nether Field and amounted to 6a 0r 32p. William Wilson died in 1818 and it passed by inheritance to his son, William George Wilson. In 1842, William Junior sold this and all his other land to James Ashwin of Bretforton. Shortly after this date, James Ashwin sold this piece of land to Edward Appelbee who owned the land either side. In 1864, Thomas Appelbee (Edward's son) unsuccessfully tried to sell this field, known as Second Netherfield, together with the rest of the Appelbee estate. It was sold nearly 30 years later when the trustees of the will of Thomas Appelbee and his sister, Mrs William Gibbs (Edward Appelbee’s children), sold it at a sale at the King’s Head Hotel, Evesham, on 6th July 1891. This was part of Claybrook Farm which comprised just under 69 acres. Arthur Savory bought the whole of Claybrook Farm, including this field, but sold it again in 1897. A detached house and a pair of semi-detached houses were built on the land in the first decade of the 20th century.

North Side – 89, 91, 91A, 91B western part (Badsey Map G088)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure which belonged to Edward Savage. It was called Nether Field and amounted to 4a 1r 4p. After Edward Savage’s death in 1819, it passed by inheritance to his great-nephew, Edward Appelbee. In 1864, Thomas Appelbee (Edward's son) unsuccessfully tried to sell this field, known as Third Netherfield, together with the rest of the Appelbee estate. It was sold nearly 30 years later when the trustees of the will of Thomas Appelbee and his sister, Mrs William Gibbs (Edward Appelbee’s children), sold it at a sale at the King’s Head Hotel, Evesham, on 6th July 1891. This was part of Claybrook Farm which comprised just under 69 acres. Arthur Savory bought the whole of Claybrook Farm, including this field, but sold it again in 1897. A pair of semi-detached houses was built on the land in the early part of the 20th century and two chalet bungalows built in the 1960s.

North Side – 91B eastern part, 93, 95 (Badsey Map G089)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure which belonged to William Wilson. It was called Nether Field and amounted to 3a 0r 15p. William Wilson died in 1818 and it passed by inheritance to his son, William George Wilson. In 1842, William Junior sold this and all his other land (amounting to 76 acres in total) to James Ashwin of Bretforton for £3290 10s 0d. Shortly after this date, James Ashwin sold this piece of land to Edward Appelbee who owned the land to the west. In 1864, Thomas Appelbee (Edward's son) unsuccessfully tried to sell this field, known as Third Netherfield, together with the rest of the Appelbee estate. It was sold nearly 30 years later when the trustees of the will of Thomas Appelbee and his sister, Mrs William Gibbs (Edward Appelbee’s children), sold it at a sale at the King’s Head Hotel, Evesham, on 6th July 1891. This was part of Claybrook Farm which comprised just under 69 acres. Arthur Savory bought the whole of Claybrook Farm, including this field, but sold it again in 1897. A pair of semi-detached houses was built on the land in the early part of the 20th century.

North Side – 97, 99 (Badsey Map G090)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure which belonged to the Reverend Thomas Williams. It was called Upper Nether Field and amounted to 1a 3r 12p. At some stage during the 19th century, it was sold to the Appelbee family who owned the neighbouring land. In 1864, Thomas Appelbee (Edward's son) unsuccessfully tried to sell this field, known as Netherfield Orchard, together with the rest of the Appelbee estate. It was sold nearly 30 years later when the trustees of the will of Thomas Appelbee and his sister, Mrs William Gibbs (Edward Appelbee’s children), sold it at a sale at the King’s Head Hotel, Evesham, on 6th July 1891. This was part of Claybrook Farm which comprised just under 69 acres. Arthur Savory bought the whole of Claybrook Farm, including the orchard, but sold it again in 1897. Two detached houses were built on the land in the early years of the 20th century.

North Side – 101, 103, Claybrook Farm (Badsey Map G092)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure which belonged to John Jones. It was called Claybrook and amounted to 2a 2r 7p. He then exchanged this and one other field at Claybrook with Sarah, Mary and Elizabeth Harrington: "And the said Commissioners hereby assign, allot and award in Exchange … in lieu of and in Exchange for All those two pieces or parcels of Inclosed Land herein after described, that is to say, Unto and for the said Mary Harrington, Elizabeth Harrington and Sarah Harrington and their Heirs, All those two pieces of Land of him the said John Jones called Claybrook Orchard and Claybrook Close containing three acres three roods and thirteen perches in lieu of and in Exchange for the said third Allotment herein before awarded in Exchange to the said Mary Harrington, Elizabeth Harrington and Sarah Harrington." The whole of the Harrington estate was bought by Edward Appelbee in the 1820s. A farm was created at Claybrook in the post-Enclosure period and two cottages (present-day numbers 101 and 103) were built. In 1864, Thomas Appelbee (Edward's son) unsuccessfully tried to sell Claybrook, together with the rest of the Appelbee estate. It was sold nearly 30 years later when the trustees of the will of Thomas Appelbee and his sister, Mrs William Gibbs (Edward Appelbee’s children), sold it at a sale at the King’s Head Hotel, Evesham, on 6th July 1891. Arthur Savory bought the whole of Claybrook Farm but sold it again in 1897. A barn, located close to the cottages, was converted into residential accommodation in the 1980s (Claybrook Farm).

North Side – 105, 107, 109, 111, 113, 115, 117, 117A, 119, 121, 123 (Badsey Map W016)

In 1815, when the Badsey Enclosure Commissioners made their awards, Mary, Elizabeth and Sarah Harrington were made the following third allotment: "Unto Mary Harrington, Elizabeth Harrington and Sarah Harrington, All that Allotment situate in Hadshill Field containing eight acres three roods and thirty-one perches, bounded on the East side by an Allotment herein awarded to the said Dean and Chapter and their Lessees the said John Millard, John Benton and Ann Slatter, on the South side by the Bretforton Turnpike Road, on the West side by old Inclosures belonging to the Reverend Thomas Williams and on the North by old Inclosures belonging to the said John Jones and herein after awarded in Exchange to the said Mary Harrington, Elizabeth Harrington and Sarah Harrington." The whole of the Harrington estate was bought by Edward Appelbee in the 1820s. In 1864, Thomas Appelbee (Edward's son) unsuccessfully tried to sell Claybrook, together with the rest of the Appelbee estate. It was sold nearly 30 years later when the trustees of the will of Thomas Appelbee and his sister, Mrs William Gibbs (Edward Appelbee’s children), sold it at a sale at the King’s Head Hotel, Evesham, on 6th July 1891. Arthur Savory bought the whole of Claybrook Farm, including this field, but sold it again in 1897. By this time he had divided up the fields in a different way. The eastern half of this field was offered for sale in Lot 1, together with the fields behind leading down to the brook, thus allowing for houses to be built on this section, without interfering with Claybrook Farm.

North Side – Market Garden Land (Badsey Map W017, W019, W020, W021, G100)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this was part of the common fields of Badsey. The Enclosure Award Commissioners made four allotments as follows: to William Wilson (33a 1r 37p), to Christ Church (7a 0r 24p and 1a 3r 18) and to the Reverend Charles Phillott (1a 1r 34p). William Wilson then exchanged land with Christ Church and the Reverend Phillott; Reverend Phillott also owned an old enclosure called Bretforton Close (5a 3r 3p) which he exchanged with William Wilson. William Wilson thus now had around 50 acres in the north-east of the parish. William Wilson died in 1818 and it passed by inheritance to his son, William George Wilson. In 1842, William Junior sold this and all his other land to James Ashwin of Bretforton. The land at this stage was divided into four arable fields: Portway (13a 1r 6p), Snightons Dean (17a 1r 32p), Clay Brook (8a 2r 29p) and Parsons Piece (10a 1r 9p). When the Ashwins sold a large amount of land on Bretforton Road further to the west in 1912, this land was not part of the sale.

North Side – Market Garden Land (Badsey Map G101)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure which belonged to Jacob Smith. It was part of a piece of land called Bretforton Close and amounted to 6a 3r 1p. It became part of the Bretforton Manor Farm estate and was sold in 1921 by the Trustees of the Wade-Browne Settlement Estates.


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South Side – The Bank House, 2A (Aldington Map Z007)

In 1807, at the time of the Aldington Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure owned by George Day. It amounted to 11a 3r 25p and comprised part of the land belonging to Aldington Farm, which had previously been owned by the Foley family for nearly 140 years. Thomas Foley of Witley had bought "all that Manor of Aldington alias Aunton, and all that farm called Aunton Farm now in the tenure of William Jarrett, gentleman" in 1665. This piece of land, together with the neighbouring field to the west, was known as Seaneys Ground, comprising 18a 3r 28p in total, and was sold by another Thomas Lord Foley in 1803 to John Procter for £760. Just over two years later, in February 1806, John Procter, sold the two fields to George Day (who had bought the remaining part of the Aldington Farm estate from the Foleys in 1805) for £1,365. On 6th October 1808, just two days after the Enclosure Awards, George Day sold the entire Aldington estate to James Ashwin of Bretforton, for £12,000. In 1815, a new main road to Evesham was built, cutting through the field. It is probably then that this eastern section was sold. By 1866, when Edward Wilson sold the land to the east, it was in the ownership of the Reverend Joseph Bourlay.

South Side – 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, 18, (Badsey Map G072)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure which belonged to Edward Wilson. It was called Hop Yard and amounted to 3a 3r 12p. Edward Wilson junior spent most of his early and middle adulthood living outside of Badsey and let out the Manor to tenant farmers. On 23rd July 1866, Edward Wilson sold this land at an auction at The Northwick Arms Hotel, Evesham, in Lot 7, together with the adjoining land which had been allotted to him in 1815. It had obviously been used at one stage for growing hops, but in 1866 was used as pasture land and orchard. The land was bought by Thomas Byrd, but the Byrd family began to sell off sections of the land in the early 20th century. Thomas Byrd was certainly the landowner in 1908 when two newly-built houses, Hopyard Villas (numbers 14 and 16) were sold to John Sears. The land immediately to the west (on which numbers 2-12 were built) was bought by William Mustoe.

See article Hopyard Villas.

South Side - 20, 22 (Badsey Map W011)

In 1815, when the Badsey Enclosure Commissioners made their awards, Samuel Jelfs was allotted the following: "Unto and for Samuel Jelfs and his Heirs in lieu of a certain footpath claimed by him for the cottage and garden in his own occupation leading from his said cottage unto through and over Badsey Leys and through the Homestead of Elizabeth Ballard and which hath been stopped by two Magistrates on view thereof, All that Allotment or parcel of Land containing sixteen perches being part of Badsey Leys, bounded on the South by the Manorial Allotment herein awarded to the said Edward Wilson, on the West by an old Inclosure belonging to the said Edward Wilson, on the North by the Turnpike Road, and on all other sides thereof by old Inclosures belonging to the said Samuel Jelfs, And the said Commissioners do hereby declare that the said Allotment is a full compensation and satisfaction to the said Samuel Jelfs as a full equivalent for the loss of the said Foot Road. And the said Commissioners order and direct that the Mounds and Fences against the said Manorial Allotment and against the said Road shall be made and for ever hereafter kept in repair by and at the expense of the said Samuel Jelfs and the owners and occupiers of the said Allotment for the time being." According to an Estate Map of 1866 when the neighbouring land was sold, it would appear that this land was owned by Reuben Andrews. A pair of semi-detached cottages was built to the north-west of Samuel Jelfs’ cottage in 1886. Samuel Jelfs’ cottage was known as The Hollybush in the early 20th century; it was pulled down in the 1950s. By 1908, when the houses to the west were sold, the cottages were in the ownership of Mrs E Pethard, but they were later bought by Frederick Cockerton Stewart who acquired all the land to the east. Number 22 was rented to Cecil Bird who established a garage there in the 1930s.

South Side - Walnut Tree House (Badsey Map W013)

In 1815, when the Badsey Enclosure Commissioners made their awards, Edward Wilson, Lord of the Manor was allotted the following: "Unto the Lord or Lords of the Manor of Badsey and his or their Heirs, All that Allotment or parcel of Land situate upon the Leys containing one acre and ten perches and bounded on the North by an Allotment herein after awarded to Samuel Jelfs, on the East by the said Evesham Road and on all other sides thereof by old Inclosures belonging to the Reverend Thomas Williams, Thomas Byrd and Edward Wilson, which said Allotment is in the agreement of the said Commissioners equal in value to one fifteenth part Roads excepted of the Waste Lands within the said Manor and is in lieu full bar of and satisfaction for his or their right of soil in the said Common and Waste Grounds within the said Manor." Walnut Tree House was built on the land in the 1980s.

South Side – 26, 28, 28A, 30, 32, 32A, 32B (Badsey Map G071)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure which belonged to Thomas Byrd. It was called Hither Green Ground and amounted to 7a 3r 35p. It remained in the Byrd family until the early 20th century, when it was bought by Frederick Cockerton Stewart. Two detached houses (26 and 28) were built in the 1920s for members of the Stewart family, followed by two more detached houses (30 and 32). Two detached bungalows were built in the 1930s and a detached house (28A) was built in the grounds of number 30 in the 1960s. The area of land behind these houses was the subject of a controversial planning application made in January 2006 to have a touring caravan park on the site, but the application was subsequently withdrawn.

South Side – 34, Vale Fresco (Badsey Map G075)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure which belonged to Thomas Byrd. It was called Three Leys Orchard and amounted to 1a 0r 27p. It remained in the Byrd family until the early 20th century, when it was bought by Frederick Cockerton Stewart.

South Side - Craven Chemicals, International Castor Company Limited, Avoncross Ornamentals, 36, 38, 40, 40A, 40B (Badsey Map G076)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure which belonged to Thomas Byrd. It was called Further Green Ground and amounted to 8a 0r 32p. It remained in the Byrd family until the early 20th century, when it was bought by Frederick Cockerton Stewart.

South Side – 42, 44, 46, 48, 48A, 50, 52, 54, 56, 58, 60, 62, 64 (Badsey Map W029)

In 1815, when the Badsey Enclosure Commissioners made their awards, John Procter was made the following fourth allotment: "Also all that other Allotment situate in Hadshill Field containing seven acres and twenty-one perches, bounded on the East by the Allotment herein awarded to the said Edward Wilson, on the South by an Allotment herein awarded to the Curate of Badsey and the Allotment herein awarded to the said Dean and Chapter and their Lessees John Millard, John Benton and Ann Slatter, on the West by old Inclosures belonging to the said Thomas Byrd and on the North by the Bretforton Turnpike Road." John Procter died in 1847 and the land was sold to This land was sold by John Procter (or his estate), it is believed in the 1840s, to siblings Sarah, Mary and William Byrd (siblings of Thomas). Miss Sarah Byrd is listed as the owner in 1866 as her brother and sister had died by this time.siblings Sarah, William and Mary Byrd. In 1890, this field, together with land to the south (which had also originally been allotted to John Procter), now comprised a field of 13a 0r 16p called Fourteens. It was split up into smaller lots and within a decade, houses had begun to be built on the land adjacent to the Bretforton Road: the present-day numbers 50, 54, 56 and 64. In 1890, William Cooke bought the land on which Beulah House (number 64) is situated; by 1896, he had sold 403 square yards of the land to Henry Edward Dipper and within a year, Beulah House had been built. Another section of the field was in the ownership of Lizzie Heritage by 1899. She sold it to William Mustoe in 1901, when it was described as follows: "And also all that piece or parcel of land situate at Badsey aforesaid fronting into the High road leading to Bretforton containing by admeasurement 2a 1r 6p or thereabout be the same more or less being part of a piece of land called Fourteens."

South Side – 66, 68, 90 (Badsey Map W028)

In 1815, when the Badsey Enclosure Commissioners made their awards, Edward Wilson was made the following fourth allotment: "Also all that other Allotment situate in Hadshill Field containing thirty-five acres two roods and twenty-four perches, bounded on the East by an Allotment herein awarded to the said Edward Wilson for Tythes, on the South by Allotments herein awarded to the said Dean and Chapter and their Lessees the said John Millard, John Benton and Ann Slatter, on the remaining part of the South by the third Allotment herein awarded to the said Joseph Jones, on part of the West by the fourth Allotment herein awarded to the said John Slatter, on further part of the West and North by the seventh and eighth Allotments herein awarded to the Curate of Badsey, on remaining part of the West by the fourth Allotment herein awarded to the said John Procter, and on the remaining part of the North by the Bretforton Road." On 23rd July 1866, Edward Wilson sold the land at an auction at The Northwick Arms Hotel, Evesham. It was now called Broad Corner with a measurement of described as being 40a 2r 27p, but this probably just reflected more accurate measuring. This large field was split into four closes of arable land (14a 1r 12p, 10a 1r 12p, 4a 1r 5p, 11a 2r 38p), but was sold as one lot. It is believed it was bought by siblings Sarah and William Byrd who owned the land to the west and the south. Rather confusingly, in 1815, Broad Corner had been the name of the field which had been allotted to Edward Wilson in 1815 on the corner of Bretforton Road and Birmingham Road but, by 1866, it had been subsumed into Upper Nether Field. A small part of the field in the north-west corner was sold in 1890 to George Geden and Wickliffe House (number 66) was built on the land. Arthur Savory bought the adjoining plot of five acres; it was referred to as Maybush Close. Savory sold the land in 1897 in Lots 6 and 7. Whilst the land was sold as suitable for erecting a dwelling-house, a house (number 68) was not erected until the 1970s. It was probably anticipated that there would be further housing development as a house was built at the eastern end of the plot and given the number 90, but no development has occurred.

South Side – Market Gardening Land (Badsey Map W027)

In 1815, when the Badsey Enclosure Commissioners made their awards, Edward Wilson was made the following allotment: "Unto Edward Wilson and his Heirs and the Person or Persons who are entitled to the same for and in lieu of the Great and Small Tythes arising renewing and increasing in and upon One Half Yard Land and now in the possession of the said Edward Wilson, All that Allotment or parcel of Land situate in Hadshill Field containing four acres three roods and five perches, bounded on the East by an Allotment herein awarded to John Procter, on the South by an Allotment herein awarded to the said Sarah Harrington and others, on the West by the fourth Allotment herein awarded to the said Edward Wilson, and on the North by the Bretforton Road." On 23rd July 1866, Edward Wilson sold the land at an auction at The Northwick Arms Hotel, Evesham. It is believed it was bought by siblings Sarah and William Byrd who owned the land to the south. In 1890, the land was sold to William Baldwyn of Ashton-under-Hill who bought much of William Byrd’s property.

South Side – Terene (Badsey Map W026)

In 1815, when the Badsey Enclosure Commissioners made their awards, John Procter was made the following fifth allotment: "Also all that other Allotment or piece of Land situate in Hadshill Field containing thirty-two acres and twenty-nine perches, bounded on the East and part of the North by the Allotment next herein after awarded to the said John Procter, on the South by an Allotment herein awarded to the said Thomas Byrd, on the West by the sixth Allotment herein awarded to the said Mary Harrington and others and the Allotment herein awarded to Edward Wilson for Tythes, and on the North by the Bretforton Road." After John Procter died in 1847, it passed by inheritance to his great-nephew, the Reverend Thomas Humphris Clark. Reverend Clark sold what was then known as the Badsey Fields Estate at auction in 1892. The field was split into six lots, lots 17-21. A barn, known as Badsey Fields Barn, had been built on the land. In the 20th century, the barn belonged to the Sears family, but it was then sold to Ted and Irene Allen. The Allens built Terene on the land which they had owned for some time. The Allens sold the house, barn and 12½ acres of land when they moved to the centre of Badsey in 1980.

South Side – Market Gardening Land (Badsey Map W024 and W025)

In 1815, when the Badsey Enclosure Commissioners made their awards, the Reverend Charles Phillott was made the following first allotment: "Unto the Reverend Charles Phillott Clerk and his successors Curates of Badsey aforesaid for and in lieu of certain portions of Tythes both Great and Small arising renewing and increasing within the said Parish of Badsey, All those Allotments or parcels of Lands next herein after mentioned, that is to say, All that Allotment or parcel of Land situate in Hadshill Field containing four acres two roods and twenty-four perches bounded on the East by an Allotment herein awarded to Joseph Harper, on part of the South by the said last mentioned Allotment and the remaining part of the South and the West by an Allotment herein after awarded to the said Charles Phillott, and on the North by the Bretforton Road." In 1815, the neighbouring field to the west was allotted to John Procter as his sixth allotment: "Also all that other Allotment situate in Hadshill Field containing eleven acres three roods and thirty-one perches, bounded on the East and part of the North by the first Allotment to the Curate of Badsey, on further part of the East and North by the Allotment herein awarded to the said Joseph Harper, on the remainder part of the East by the Parish of Bretforton, on part of the South by an Allotment herein awarded to the said Thomas Byrd, the remaining part of the South and on the West by the Allotment last herein before awarded to the said John Procter, and on the North by the Bretforton Road, which said last mentioned Allotment is herein awarded in Exchange to the said Charles Phillott." He then exchanged the plot with the Reverend Charles Phillott for land in Aldington: "Unto the said Reverend Charles Phillott, Clerk, and his successors, Curates of the Parish of Badsey aforesaid, All that the aforesaid Allotment or parcel of Land containing eleven acres and three roods and thirty-one perches being the sixth Allotment herein awarded to the said John Procter and bounded as herein before is described in lieu of and in Exchange for, All that messuage or Tenement and buildings and those two closes or Inclosed Grounds herein after described …."

South Side – The Boundary (Badsey Map W023)

In 1815, when the Badsey Enclosure Commissioners made their awards, Joseph Harper was made the following allotment: "Unto Joseph Harper and his Heirs in lieu of the Commonable part of his estate and right of Common thereunto belonging, All that Allotment or parcel of Land situate in Hadshill Field containing eleven acres one rood and four perches, bounded on part of the East by the Parish of Bretforton, on the South and part of the West by an Allotment herein awarded to the said John Procter and herein after awarded in Exchange to the said Charles Phillott, on the remainder of the West and part of the North by the first Allotment herein awarded to the said Charles Phillott, on the remainder of the North by the fourth Allotment herein awarded to the said Joseph Jones and herein after awarded in Exchange to the said Joseph Harper and the Bretforton Turnpike Road, and the remaining part of the East by the last mentioned Allotment. And the said Commissioners order and direct that the Mounds and Fences on the East and North sides of the said Allotment shall be made and at all times for ever thereafter kept in repair by and at the expense of the said Joseph Harper and the owners and occupiers of the said Allotment for the time being." It is not known when it passed out of Joseph Harper’s hands, but since the first part of the 20th century, it has been owned by the Meadows family. A bungalow called The Boundary was built on the land in the early 1980s.

 

Where they are available, links are provided to historical information about places and buildings. This index of roads and paths in Badsey and Aldington was compiled as part of the Badsey Society Enclosure Map Project. The house numbers and names are correct as at May 2006. Every care has been taken to provide accurate information, but if you are aware of any error, please contact us. If you wish to provide a history or memories of an individual house on this road, please email History@badsey.net.


Badsey is a large working village in Worcestershire, England. Aldington is a smaller village in the same parish. The Badsey Society exists to promote the understanding and study of the villages and the surrounding area. The Enclosure Map Project traces the development of the villages since the publication of enclosure maps in 1807 and 1812. The Society is grateful for a grant received from the Local Heritage Initiative.
Updated 7 July 2013. Email History@badsey.net.