Enclosure map project

Brewers Lane, Badsey

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Roads and paths in Badsey and Aldington

Link to WCC GIS map
Click on the image above to see this road on the Worcestershire County Council GIS website with the digitised historical maps. Click on the image below to view the original enclosure map.
enclosure map

Photos taken 2006. Aerial photos: a7075 a7076

BREWERS LANE


Brewer's Lane in the 1920s

In 1815, when the Badsey Enclosure Act Commissioners made their awards, this road was simply referred to as Private Carriage Road Number 9. It was described as follows: "One other private Carriage Road and Drift Way of the breadth of thirty feet marked Number 9 on the said plan, commencing at the last described Road and extending in an Eastwardly direction until it communicates with the Allotments herein after awarded to Joseph Jones and John Procter and for their use." In a Sales Catalogue of 1831, it was referred to as Fothersway Lane but in the census returns of 1881, 1891 and 1901, the old cottages which are now numbers 18, 20 and 22, were given an address of The Green, as they were on the western side of an area known as Badsey Green. Joseph Jones owned the private road and all of the land either side (with the exception of the most north-eastern field). He sold it all at auction on 15th August 1831 and it was bought by siblings Sarah, William and Mary Byrd. The land passed by inheritance to their nephew, William Byrd (1841-1902). William Byrd got into financial difficulties and appeared in a debtors’ court in 1880; by the 1890s, William Smith, the Trustee, was entitled to all William Byrd’s land-holdings and began to sell of the land. Most of the land was sold in the 1890s, much of it passing into the ownership of James Brewer, after whom the road is named. He established a bakery on the corner with Chapel Street.

The 1815 road does not include the westerly part of the present-day Brewers Lane (ie the section leading from High Street to the junction with Chapel Street). The first part of the road was described as follows: "One private Carriage Road and Drift Way of the breadth of thirty-five feet marked Number 8 on the said plan commencing at the Village of Badsey, extending in an Eastwardly and Southwardly direction until it communicates with the Wickhamford Road at the East end of Gibbs Lane." It was known as Lanket Lane until the mid 20th century (derived from Langet meaning a narrow strip of land). The Ordnance Survey map of 1923 indicates that the whole road was Lanket Lane, but certainly it was being called Brewers Lane from at least 1907. It was not until the 1960s when houses began to be built in the western section of the road that it was included in with Brewers Lane.

The road is a mixture of housing styles: 18th century cottages, a number of late Victorian and Edwardian detached villas and terraces, a house and bungalow built in the 1930s, and some late 20th century development. The housing on the north side starts at number 13. This was because land had become available for development but, in the event, St James’ Close was built which had a separate numbering system. On the south side, there is no number 2 (presumably space was left in case a further house was built) and number 16 no longer exists as it was demolished in the 1980s.

North Side - 13, 15, 17, 19, 21, 23, 23A The Sett, The Drey, Greenways, 25 (Badsey Map W009)

Until 1815, this was an area of common land (presumed to be used for pasture) known as Badsey Green (2a 0r 0p). In 1815, the Enclosure Commissioners allotted the land to John Procter. The Schedule says: "Unto John Procter and his Heirs in lieu of the Commonable part of his estate and right of Common thereunto belonging purchased by him of and from Thomas Burrowes and Susannah his wife, All those six several Allotments next herein after awarded, that is to say, All that Allotment or parcel of Land situate in Badsey Green containing two acres, bounded on the East by an old Inclosure belonging to the said John Procter, on the South by the private carriage Road marked Number 9, on the West by old Inclosures belonging to the said Thomas Byrd, William Smith and others and on the North by the Evesham Road and an Allotment herein awarded to the said William Wilson." Whilst the Commissioners allotted this to John Procter in 1815, by 1831 it was in the ownership of Joseph Jones who sold this pasture land at auction, along with neighbouring Townside Close to Sarah, William and Mary Byrd. The land (now combined with the neighbouring plot to the east) was sold in 1890 to William Hurd Adams; it was described as a Hovel Ground or Green of 6a 0r 11p and was used as pasture. In the south-east corner of the plot, William Hurd Adams erected a terrace of six cottages known as South View (numbers 13-23) in 1893, and then sold the land to the north and east to James Brewer. A detached house (number 25) was built at the end of the 19th century to house the baker. In 1988, Frank Goldstraw, whose family had owned Chalcroft on Old Post Office Lane since 1956 (on the land bought by James Brewer), sold a small portion of the land and Greenways was built. A track, marked as an Occupation Road on early 20th century plans of Chalcroft, still exists to this day, providing access to The Sett, The Drey and Greenways.

North Side - 27, 29, 31, 33, 35 (Badsey Map G068)

This area of land was known as Townside Close (2a 3r 32p). It was an old enclosure which, according to the 1815 allotment of the neighbouring Badsey Green, belonged to John Procter but, in the same year, according to a separate schedule of proprietors, was owned by Joseph Jones. In 1831, Joseph Jones sold this pasture land at auction, along with neighbouring The Green to siblings Sarah, William and Mary Byrd. The land (now combined with the neighbouring plot to the west) was sold in 1890 to William Hurd Adams; it was described as a Hovel Ground or Green of 6a 0r 11p and was used as pasture. William Hurd Adams then sold part of the land to the north and east to James Brewer. Housing development began on this piece of land in the early 20th century.

North Side – 37, 39, 41, 43, 45 (Badsey Map W035)

Until 1815, this was an area of common land which was part of a very large field called Hadshill Field. In 1815, the Enclosure Commissioners awarded part of this field (6a 0r 24p) to Joseph Jones as his second allotment: "Also all that other Allotment situate in Hadshill Field containing six acres and twenty-four perches, bounded on the East side by an Allotment herein awarded to the Reverend Thomas Williams and afterwards Exchanged to John Procter, on the South side by the private carriage Road marked Number 9, on the West side by old Inclosures and the third Allotment herein awarded to the said John Procter, and on the North side by old Inclosures belonging to the said Thomas Byrd." In 1831, Joseph Jones sold this at auction to siblings Sarah, William and Mary Byrd. It remained in the Byrd family or that of their executors, until 1903, when it was sold to George Attwood; it was by now known as New Piece. In 1934, his daughter, Winifred Clifford, sold 840 square yards in the south-west corner to Rose Marion Barnard; the bungalow which is now number 45 was built on this land. The rest of New Piece remained in the Attwood/Clifford family until 1973 when it was sold after the death of Winifred Clifford, to Frank Goldstraw, Stan Goldstraw and Frederick Barnard (husband of Rose who had bought a small section of the land in 1934). It remains in the Goldstraw family to this day.

North Side – Belvedere House, Contrada Farms (Badsey Map W034)

Until 1815, this was an area of common land which was part of a very large field called Hadshill Field. In 1815, the Enclosure Commissioners awarded part of this field (8a 0r 26p) to the Reverend Thomas Williams as his sixth allotment: "Also all that other Allotment situate in Hadshill Field containing eight acres and twenty-six perches, bounded on the East by Allotments herein awarded to the said Dean and Chapter and their Lessees the said John Millard, John Benton and Ann Slatter, the Curate of Badsey and to John Slatter, on the South by the third Allotment herein awarded to Joseph Jones, on the West by the second Allotment herein awarded to the said Joseph Jones, and on the North by an old Inclosure belonging to the said Thomas Byrd, which said last mentioned Allotment is awarded in Exchange to the said John Procter." He then exchanged this land with John Procter: "And the said Commissioners hereby assign, allot and award in Exchange unto the said John Procter and his Heirs, All that the aforesaid Allotment or parcel of Land containing eight acres and twenty-six perches being the sixth Allotment herein awarded to the said Thomas Williams and bounded as herein described in lieu of and in Exchange for, All those three Cottages and Gardens and also all those two Closes herein after described." It was bought by siblings Sarah, William and Mary Byrd following John Procter’s death in 1847.


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South Side - 4, 6, 8, 10 (Badsey Map G045)

This area of land was known as Langet (0a 2r 27p). It was an old enclosure which belonged to Joseph Jones. Joseph Jones sold this at auction, along with the majority of his other land and property, in 1831. It was bought by siblings Sarah, William and Mary Byrd. It remained in the Byrd family until 1890 when it was sold by William Smith, their Trustee, to William Baldwyn of Ashton under Hill, who also bought Seward House on the opposite side of the High Street. It was then known as Langet Orchard, used as pasture, and comprised 0a 3r 23p. After his death in 1898, it passed by inheritance to his co-heiresses, Frances Baldwyn Smith and Ann Heavens Bamber, who then sold the orchard and Seward House to Julius Sladden for £1,430. In May 1951, two of Sir Julius Sladden’s daughters, May and Ethel Sladden, sold the orchard to Francis Edward Jones. In 1954, the most easterly section of the land, comprising 1,071 square yards, was sold to Frederick Joseph Barnard, on which number 10 was later erected. In 1961, a further 4,956 square yards was sold to Frederick Barnard, being the middle section of land (the most westerly section having been built on by Francis Jones).

South Side - 12, 14 (Badsey Map W006)

Until 1815, this was an area of common land (presumed to be used for pasture) known as Badsey Green (1a 3r 15p). In 1815, the Enclosure Commissioners allotted the land to Joseph Jones. The Schedule says: "Unto Joseph Jones and his Heirs in lieu of the Commonable part of his estate and right of Common thereunto belonging, All those four several Allotments next herein after awarded, that is to say, All that Allotment or parcel of Land situate on Badsey Green containing one acre three roods and fifteen perches, bounded on part of the East and North sides by the second Allotment herein awarded to Edward Wilson, on the remainder of the East by an old Inclosure belonging to Sarah Wilson and on the South-West and remainder of the North sides by private Carriage Roads." Joseph Jones sold this at auction, along with the majority of his other land and property, in 1831. It was bought by siblings Sarah, William and Mary Byrd. It was bought by James Brewer in the 1890s and he established a bakehouse on this corner plot.

South Side - 18, 20, 22, Hunters Lodge, Badgers Cottage, Poachers Cottage, Keepers Cottage, Farriers Cottage (Badsey Map G067)

In the early 19th century, a row of four cottages and gardens (present-day numbers 18 and 20 being the only ones remaining) comprising 0a 1r 4p, existed on this plot of land. Slightly separate from the row was another cottage (present-day number 22). The cottages were an old enclosure belonging to Sarah Wilson. The land immediately to the west of the cottages, which had been a small area of common land (presumed to be used for pasture) and was part of Badsey Green (0a 0r 18p) was, in 1815, allotted to Sarah’s brother, Edward Wilson, by the Enclosure Commissioners. The Schedule says: "Also all that other Allotment situate on Badsey Green containing eighteen perches, bounded on the East by old Inclosures belonging to Sarah Wilson, on the South and West by the first Allotment herein awarded to the said Joseph Jones, and on the North by the private carriage Road marked Number 9." This plot of land now forms the entrance to the cottages. At some time between 1815 and 1831, Sarah Wilson appears to have sold the cottages to Joseph Jones, as he in turn sold the row of four cottages in 1831 as Lot III. They were bought by siblings Sarah, William and Mary Byrd. These cottages and gardens comprised 0a 2r 8p. They remained in the Byrd family until the 1890s when it is believed they were sold to James Brewer. Of the original row of four cottages, the most northerly two were demolished in 1933. A bungalow, later numbered 16, was built on the site. Number 16 was itself demolished to allow for the building of the five maisonettes (Hunters, Badgers, Poachers, Keepers and Farriers Cottage) in about 1990. Immediately to the south of the present-day number 22, there was an orchard (0a 2r 13p), also owned by Sarah Wilson. It is possible that the cottage was on this latter piece of land but seems to have been included in the schedules for the other cottages.


Keen family at the Green

South Side - 24, 26, 28, 30, 32, 34, 36 (Badsey Map G065)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this was an old enclosure which belonged to Joseph Jones. It was known as Adcock’s Close (3a 2r 24p). Joseph Jones sold this at auction, along with the majority of his other land and property, in 1831. It was bought by siblings Sarah, William and Mary Byrd. By 1890, when it was bought by the Evesham builders Espley & Co, it was known as Ox Close (as also was the land to the west) and was used as pasture. One assumes that Ox Close was a corruption of Adcock’s Close. In 1901, Espleys sold the land to James Brewer who then sold off the southern part of the land (fronting Badsey Fields Lane) in 1905. In 1906, he built six detached houses (present-day numbers 24-34) on the northern section of the plot; the undeveloped field to the south, in between the two areas which had been sold off for building, became known as Brewer’s Meadow. The most north-easterly section of the plot was sold to Edwin Knight in 1907; this was then sold to Charles Savage in 1931, then to Alfred William Sparrow in the same year and a house (number 36) was built on the land a few years later.

South Side – Ridge and Furrow land (Badsey Map G064)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this land was an old enclosure owned by Joseph Jones. It was called Brain’s Close and amounted to 3a 2r 29p. Joseph Jones sold this at auction, along with the majority of his other land and property, in 1831. It was bought by siblings Sarah, William and Mary Byrd. The land passed by inheritance to their nephew, William Byrd (1841-1902). The land was sold off around the turn of the century and was bought by William Hurd Adams. It now comprised a field of 3a 3r 19p called Brain’s Orchard and was used as pasture. By 1907, it was in the ownership of Mrs Elizabeth Evans. Whilst the southern section of the land (fronting Badsey Fields Lane) was sold off for housing development in the 1920s, this northern section has never been developed and is the only place in the parish where the old ridge and furrow field patterns can be seen.

South Side - Recreation Club (Badsey Map W041)

Until 1815, this was an area of common land in part of Hadshill Field (the total allotment amounted to 37a 2r 32p). In 1815, the Enclosure Commissioners allotted the land to Joseph Jones as his third allotment. The Schedule says: "Also all that other Allotment situate in Hadshill Field and Foxhill Field containing thirty-seven acres two roods and thirty-two perches including the private Road passing over the same, bounded on the East side by an Allotment herein awarded to the said Dean and Chapter and their Lessees the said John Millard, John Benton and Ann Slatter and herein after Exchanged with the said Joseph Jones, on the South side by Allotments herein awarded to the said Thomas Byrd and the Churchwardens of Badsey and the Marchioness of Downshire, and an old Inclosure belonging to the said Thomas Byrd on further part of the East side by the said last mentioned old Inclosure and Pitchness Closes, on further part of the South by old Inclosures belonging to Edward Wilson and an Allotment herein awarded to the said Thomas Byrd, on the remainder of the East by the said last mentioned Allotment, an old Inclosure belonging to the said Joseph Harper and herein after awarded in Exchange to the said Joseph Jones and the second Allotment herein awarded to the said John Jones, on further part of the South by the said private carriage Road marked Number 11, on part of the West and remainder of the South by old Inclosures belonging to the said Joseph Jones, on further part of the West by the first Allotment herein awarded to the said John Jones, on part of the North and remainder of the West by old Inclosures belonging to the said Joseph Jones and on the remainder of the North by Allotments herein awarded to the Reverend Thomas Williams, John Slatter and Edward Wilson respectively." Joseph Jones sold this at auction in 1831. It was bought by siblings Sarah, William and Mary Byrd and remained in the Byrd family until the end of the 19th century.

Where they are available, links are provided to historical information about places and buildings. This index of roads and paths in Badsey and Aldington was compiled as part of the Badsey Society Enclosure Map Project. The house numbers and names are correct as at May 2006. Every care has been taken to provide accurate information, but if you are aware of any error, please contact us. If you wish to provide a history or memories of an individual house on this road, please email History@badsey.net.


Badsey is a large working village in Worcestershire, England. Aldington is a smaller village in the same parish. The Badsey Society exists to promote the understanding and study of the villages and the surrounding area. The Enclosure Map Project traces the development of the villages since the publication of enclosure maps in 1807 and 1812. The Society is grateful for a grant received from the Local Heritage Initiative.
Updated 7 July 2013. Email History@badsey.net.