Enclosure map project

The Knapp, Badsey

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Roads and paths in Badsey and Aldington

Link to WCC GIS map
Click on the image above to see this road on the Worcestershire County Council GIS website with the digitised historical maps. Click on the image below to view the original enclosure map.
enclosure map

Photos taken 2006. Aerial photo: a7227

THE KNAPP

The Knapp is a housing development built in two phases off Seward Road. The first phase was in the 1980s when five detached houses were built. The second phase was in about 1994 when land at the eastern end became available and eight more houses were built (six detached and two semi-detached). Originally, the houses just had house names and not numbers, but then numbers were allocated (numbers 1-15 but no numbers 2 or 13). In 2006, it is still more common for the houses to be called by their names, even though the Post Office database only recognises the numbers. Here are details about the planning applications for The Knapp (link to be added).

The road is named after Nap Close and Nap Orchard, plots of land just to the south.

North Side –3 northern part Scots Corner, 4 northern part, 7 Hidcote House, 8 Chestnuts, 9 Buckland House (Badsey Map G019)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this land was an old enclosure owned by John Jones. It was part of the land on which his house (The Laurels, High Street) and homestead was situated and ran down to Badsey Brook; it amounted to 1a 0r 6p. After John Jones’ death, the house was bought by siblings Sarah, William and Mary Byrd. The house and land passed by inheritance to their nephew, William Byrd (1841-1902). William Byrd got into financial difficulties and appeared in a debtors’ court in 1880; an Abstract of Title dated 1890 shows that William Smith, the Trustee, was entitled to all William Byrd’s land-holdings, and began to sell off the land and property.


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South Side – 5 Lochaber, 6 Lichfield, 12 Charlbury House, 14 Foxcote, 15 Millbrook (Badsey Map G015)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this plot of land was an old enclosure which belonged to Joseph Jones. It formed part of the grounds of a house and homestead (Malvern House) which amounted to 1a 3r 27p. Joseph Jones sold most of his land and houses in Badsey in 1831, but retained this property. The Jones family had financial difficulties and, in 1868, Joseph’s widow and children were forced to sell the house because of defaulting on the mortgage. It was bought by William Byrd, whose family owned some of the large houses along the High Street. William Byrd himself got into financial difficulties and appeared in a debtors’ court in 1880; an Abstract of Title dated 1890 shows that William Smith, the Trustee, was entitled to all William Byrd’s land-holdings, and began to sell off the land. It was known as Malvern House by 1890. The house was put up for sale at public auction on 30th June 1890 and was bought by William Baldwyn of Ashton-under-Hill, who also purchased Seward House. After his death in 1898, it passed by inheritance to his co-heiresses, Frances Baldwyn Smith and Ann Heavens Bamber, who then sold the house to Arthur Edward Jones in 1901 for £656. Arthur was the grandson of Joseph Jones who had owned the house at the time of Enclosure and so the family home was recovered. The house remained in the Jones family until 1996 when Arthur’s daughter-in-law, Bertha died, although 1.26 acres of land at the back was sold in 1977 to SquareDeal Homes Ltd, which paved the way for the building of these houses.

East Side – 10 Church Cottage, 11 Manor Cottage; North Side – Compton Corner 1, Scots Corner 3 southern part, 4 southern part, 7 front drive Hidcote House, 8 front drive Chestnuts, 9 front drive Buckland House (Badsey Map G018)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this land was an old enclosure owned by Joseph Jones. It was part of the garden of a house and homestead (demolished in 1869) and amounted to 1a 0r 20p. Joseph Jones sold this at auction, along with the majority of his other land and property, in 1831. It was bought by siblings Sarah, William and Mary Byrd. By the mid 19th century, several families seemed to live in the building, and a part of it was used for a Wesleyan chapel. According to documents at Christ Church, it was empty for some years and was bought in 1869 and knocked down. The land passed by inheritance to their nephew, William Byrd (1841-1902). William Byrd got into financial difficulties and appeared in a debtors’ court in 1880; an Abstract of Title dated 1890 shows that William Smith, the Trustee, was entitled to all William Byrd’s land-holdings, and began to sell off the land.

Where they are available, links are provided to historical information about places and buildings. This index of roads and paths in Badsey and Aldington was compiled as part of the Badsey Society Enclosure Map Project. The house numbers and names are correct as at May 2006. Every care has been taken to provide accurate information, but if you are aware of any error, please contact us. If you wish to provide a history or memories of an individual house on this road, please email History@badsey.net.


Badsey is a large working village in Worcestershire, England. Aldington is a smaller village in the same parish. The Badsey Society exists to promote the understanding and study of the villages and the surrounding area. The Enclosure Map Project traces the development of the villages since the publication of enclosure maps in 1807 and 1812. The Society is grateful for a grant received from the Local Heritage Initiative.
Updated 7 July 2013. Email History@badsey.net.