Enclosure map project

School Lane, Badsey

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Roads and paths in Badsey and Aldington

Link to WCC GIS map
Click on the image above to see this road on the Worcestershire County Council GIS website with the digitised historical maps. Click on the image below to view the original enclosure map.
enclosure map

Photos taken 2006. Aerial photo: a7115

SCHOOL LANE

At the time of the Badsey Enclosure, this road was called the Wickhamford Road by the Commissioners, but it is shown on the map as Gibbs Lane and is referred to in the schedules as: "One public Carriage Road and Highway of the breadth of thirty-five feet marked Number 3 on the said map leading in an Eastwardly direction out of the Village of Badsey aforesaid until it enters the Green, from thence in a Southwardly direction over the West side of the said Green until it enters Bully Brook Lane and from thence in or near its usual track before it communicates with the Willersey Road." The section referring to School Lane is the first part before it turns in a southerly direction.

It was called Gibbs Lane after the Gibbs family who owned what is now The Wheatsheaf Inn and all the land on the north side of School Lane. During most of the 19th century it was called Bakers Lane with the 1851, 1861, 1871, 1881, 1891 and 1901 censuses giving this as the road name. Up until his death in 1825, Nathan Gibbs operated a bakery business; in 1851, Edward Cook was listed as a baker and grocer. It was still called Bakers Lane in 1901, even though the school had been erected on the south side in 1895. On the Ordnance Survey map of 1923, the road is named as Barker’s Lane (presumably a mistake for Baker’s Lane), but by 1938 it was known by its present name of School Lane. The houses are numbered 1-17, which include a number 13 but no 14 or 16. Development began with The Bell Inn, on the north side, probably in the 18th century. During the 19th century, cottages were erected on the south side, but were demolished in the 20th century. At the end of the 19th century, the school and schoolmaster’s house was built at the other end of the lane on the south side. Further development did not take place until the 20th century.

North Side - 1, 1A, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 15, 17 (Badsey Map G055)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this land was an old enclosure owned by John Gibbs (whom it is believed bought the land from Robert Mason in 1780). It was part of the house and homestead which is now The Wheatsheaf and amounted to 1a 1r 38p. It remained in the Gibbs family ownership until the mid 19th century. From about the mid 19th century, the The Bell Inn was located at the start of the lane, backing on to what is now The Wheatsheaf (which did not become an inn until the 1870s). For almost a century there were two inns next-door to each other, but The Bell Inn closed down in the late 1970s and was converted solely into residential accommodation (present day numbers 1-5). Two pairs of semi-detached houses (numbers 11-17) were built in the 1930s. Two detached houses (numbers 7 and 9) were built in the 1970s.


Old Buildings in School Lane


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South Side - 2, 4 (Badsey Map G056)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this land was an old enclosure owned by the Reverend Thomas Williams. It consisted of barns, yards and rickyards and amounted to 0a 3r 34p. Thomas Williams died in 1829 and the land passed by inheritance to the Allies family, remaining in their ownership until 1864 when they sold it to Joseph Woodward, the agent of the estate. Woodward in turn sold the Badsey part of the estate in 1866 (lot 1) to John Pickup Lord; he died in 1877, but his executors administered the estate for some time. During the first part of the 20th century, it was owned by Arthur Jones who lived in the house opposite, The Stone House. In the 1940s, he rented the yard to John Sutton, an Evesham builder. He used this as his base until 1956 when he bought his own land off Old Post Offce Lane. Houses were built on the land in the 1970s. Number 2 is semi-detached with number 31 High Street.

South Side - 6, 8, 10, 12, Badsey First School (Badsey Map G057)

In 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, this land was an old enclosure owned by the Reverend Thomas Williams. It was called Pig Close and amounted to 2a 1r 31p. Thomas Williams exchanged a small part of the land, close to the Vicarage, 26 perches, with the Reverend Charles Phillott, but this section remained in Williams’ hands. Thomas Williams died in 1829 and the land passed by inheritance to the Allies family, remaining in their ownership until 1864 when they sold it to Joseph Woodward, the agent of the estate. Woodward in turn sold the Badsey part of the estate in 1866 (lot 1) to John Pickup Lord; he died in 1877, but his executors administered the estate for some time. Two cottages were built on the land in the mid 19th century. In February 1894, the most north-easterly section of this land, amounting to 0a 2r 32p, was sold by Messrs Parker & Lord on behalf of the Trustees of the late Captain Lord for the sum of £90. The School Board agreed to pay the vendor’s costs and tenants’ compensation if any, and to put up a fence to divide the land sold from the remaining piece to the west on which the cottages were situated. The school was opened on the new site in June 1895. The cottages were demolished in the mid 20th century to make way for modern housing development and numbers 6-12 were built on the land in the 1970s. In 1960, the school acquired extra land for a playing-field. This was land which had been part of an old enclosure (G059) called Great Stockey amounting to 6a 2r 22p which had originally belonged to the Reverend Thomas Williams. In the 20th century, the land was divided into smaller plots. In 1919, Christ Church leased the middle section, comprising 3a 2r 34p and 1.87 acres, to Victor Charles Edward Cockerton, which he bought in 1951. In 1960, Victor’s daughter, Winifred Joan Smith, sold the northerly section of 1.87 acres (part 99) to Worcestershire County Council for £950 in order to provide a school playing-field. A right of way existed over the land (this right of way had not been present at the time of Enclosure), but this was officially stopped in 1961. (See 1894 map showing land for the school.)

See articles and photos about history of Badsey School.

School
Badsey School in the 1920s

South Side – School House (Badsey Map G057, W004 and W003)

The plot of land on which School House is situated is actually made up of three different plots from enclosure times. The western part of the site is located on a plot of land which, in 1812, at the time of the Badsey Enclosure Act, was an old enclosure owned by the Reverend Thomas Williams. It was called Pig Close and amounted to 2a 1r 31p. The north-eastern part of the site (on the corner of the road) was allotted to the Reverend Thomas Williams in 1815: "Unto the Reverend Thomas Williams and his Heirs in lieu of the Commonable part of his estate and right of Common thereunto belonging, All those six several Allotments next herein after awarded, that is to say, All that Allotment situate on Powells Green containing four perches, bounded on the South by the first Allotment herein awarded to the said James Harris, on the West by an old Inclosure belonging to the said Thomas Williams and on the North by the Wickhamford Road." Thomas Williams died in 1829 and the land passed by inheritance to the Allies family, remaining in their ownership until 1864 when they sold it to Joseph Woodward, the agent of the estate. Woodward in turn sold the Badsey part of the estate in 1866 (lot 1) to John Pickup Lord; he died in 1877, but his executors administered the estate for some time. The eastern part of the site was part of land allotted to James Harris as his first allotment in 1815: "Unto James Harris and his Heirs in lieu of the Commonable part of his estate and right of Common thereunto belonging, All those two several Allotments next herein after awarded, that is to say, All that Allotment or parcel of Land situate in Powells Green containing thirty-seven perches and bounded on the East side by Wickhamford Road and on the South side by the second Allotment herein awarded to the said Thomas Williams, on the West side by old Inclosures belonging to the said James Harris and Thomas Williams and on the North by the first Allotment herein awarded to the said Thomas Williams." In 1864, this plot of land, together with an area of farmland further south on the Willersey Road, and an orchard called The Pinnock, was sold by John Harris of Cropthorne, for a total of £1,200 to Christ Church. In 1894, the Reverend Charles Gepp applied to Christ Church for consent to sell sell a strip of glebe in order to build a School House for the new school which was being built on the adjacent land. The Head Teacher, John Henry McDonald, moved into the new house in 1896. It remained the property of the school until 1991 when it was sold to a private owner as there was no longer a need to provide a school house.

Where they are available, links are provided to historical information about places and buildings. This index of roads and paths in Badsey and Aldington was compiled as part of the Badsey Society Enclosure Map Project. The house numbers and names are correct as at May 2006. Every care has been taken to provide accurate information, but if you are aware of any error, please contact us. If you wish to provide a history or memories of an individual house on this road, please email History@badsey.net.


Badsey is a large working village in Worcestershire, England. Aldington is a smaller village in the same parish. The Badsey Society exists to promote the understanding and study of the villages and the surrounding area. The Enclosure Map Project traces the development of the villages since the publication of enclosure maps in 1807 and 1812. The Society is grateful for a grant received from the Local Heritage Initiative.
Updated 7 July 2013. Email History@badsey.net.