Badsey Commemorative Mile Post

The grand unveiling of the long-awaited mile post took place on Sunday 9th December 2001 in School Lane, Badsey. The Chairman of the Badsey Millennium Committee, Mr Chris Helm, assisted by other members of the committee, unveiled the post which is situated at the front of Badsey First School in the new, low-maintenance Millennium Garden. The mile post points the way to Wickhamford and to Evesham. Mr Helm also opened the Christmas Fayre which had been organised by the Parent Teacher Association. He wrote an article for the children of Badsey First School reproduced below.

Kathryn Hough (Chairman, Badsey First School PTA)
badseyvc@surfaid.org

Badsey Commemorative Mile Post: a short history

To celebrate the Millennium an idea of putting up something for everyone to see was suggested. Money for this was raised from collections and sale of Millennium Tea Towels.

At first it was to be a "Totem Pole" made from a local tree. Wood is what people many years ago would use, but no "Totems" were to be found anywhere so that idea did not grow.

Then came the idea from the Stone Age when a piece of Cotswold Stone from someone called a Mason was suggested, but nobody called Mr Stone Mason could be found. So that idea crumbled.

At last an Iron Age idea arrived and the Mile Post as you now see it was made from Cast Iron.

How was it made?

First a wooden one was made (called a Pattern) in Badsey and taken to Ironbridge in Shropshire, which is where the Industrial Revolution started. There it was placed in special sand to make the shape of the Mile Post. The Pattern was then taken out of the sand and molten iron was poured into the space left in the sand. When it went cold the sand was knocked off. The bare iron Mile Post was brought back to Badsey, painted and erected at Badsey First School on 9th December 2001.

Size is 50 inches (1270 mm) long and 9 inches (229 mm) wide.

It is hoped that this Mile Post will last longer than the 15 inch (381 mm) First World War Shell Case which was put up on The School Green in 1922. There is no record of when it was taken away.

Chris Helm


Photo: Adrian Hough

Updated 24 May 2002